Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy by Lisa Larsen (1953)

Lisa Larsen (1925-1959) was one of LIFE’s poioneering female photojournalists. Born in Germany, she moved to the United States as a teenager. She started out as a picture file clerk at Black Star, but soon became a freelance photographer for many publications, including Vogue, The New York Times, Parade, Glamour, Charm, Holiday, and LIFE.

After 1948, the bulk of Larsen’s photojournalism was contract work for LIFE. In the beginning of her career at the influential magazine, she was assigned mainly entertainment and fashion stories, such as photographing the Vanderbilts, Kennedys, Bing Crosby, and the Duke of Windsor as well as the Greenbriar Hotel (source).

Bouvier and Kennedy were married on September 12, 1953, at St. Mary’s Church in Newport, Rhode Island, in a Mass celebrated by Boston’s Archbishop Richard Cushing. The wedding was considered the social event of the season with an estimated 700 guests at the ceremony and 1,200 at the reception that followed at Hammersmith Farm. The wedding dress, now housed in the Kennedy Library in Boston, Massachusetts, and the dresses of her attendants were created by designer Ann Lowe of New York City.

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Lisa Larsen, Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy, September 1953 via

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Lisa Larsen, Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy, September 1953 via

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Lisa Larsen, Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy, September 1953 via

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Lisa Larsen, John and Jacqueline Kennedy at Their Wedding Reception, September 1953 via

 

Vivien Leigh in Caesar and Cleopatra (1945)

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1945: Vivien Leigh (1913 – 1967) in her costume for George Bernard Shaw’s ‘Caesar and Cleopatra’, directed in Technicolour by Gabriel Pascal at Denham Studios. 

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1945: Vivien Leigh (1913 – 1967) in her costume for George Bernard Shaw’s ‘Caesar and Cleopatra’, directed in Technicolour by Gabriel Pascal at Denham Studios.

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Marvelous Portraits by Edward Weston

Edward Henry Weston (1886 – 1958) was a 20th-century American photographer. He has been called:

“one of the most innovative and influential American photographers…” and “one of the masters of 20th century photography.”

Over the course of his 40-year career Weston photographed an increasingly expansive set of subjects, including landscapes, still lifes, nudes, portraits, genre scenes and even whimsical parodies. It is said that he developed a:

“quintessentially American, and specially Californian, approach to modern photography”

because of his focus on the people and places of the American West. In 1937 Weston was the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship, and over the next two years he produced nearly 1,400 negatives using his 8 × 10 view camera. Some of his most famous photographs were taken of the trees and rocks at Point Lobos, California, near where he lived for many years.

Weston was born in Chicago and moved to California when he was 21. He knew he wanted to be a photographer from an early age, and initially his work was typical of the soft focus pictorialism that was popular at the time. Within a few years, however, he abandoned that style and went on to be one of the foremost champions of highly detailed photographic images.

In 1947 he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and he stopped photographing soon thereafter. He spent the remaining ten years of his life overseeing the printing of more than 1,000 of his most famous images.

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Edward Weston, Portrait of Ruth St. Denis, 1916 via

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Edward Weston, Unidentified Woman, 1920 via

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Tina Modotti, Glendale. Photograph by Edward Weston, 1921 via

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Edward Weston. Frida Kahlo, 1930 via

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Xenia Kashevaroff photographed by Edward Weston in 1931. This portrait is now in the collection of New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art via

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Edward Weston, Charis Wilson, 1941 The Lane Collection
Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston via

Amazing Surreal Photomontages by Grete Stern II

Grete Stern (1904–99) began taking private classes with Walter Peterhans―soon to become head of photography at the Bauhaus―in Berlin in 1927. Stern is best known as half of Foto Ringl + Pit, the innovative advertising and design studio she founded in Berlin in 1929 with her fellow Bauhaus alumna Ellen Auerbach.

In 1932 Stern met fellow photographer Horacio Coppola at the Bauhaus. In 1933 they emigrated to London where they married. Two years later in 1935 they settled in Coppola’s native Argentina. Two months after arriving they presented what the magazine Sur called

“the first serious exhibition of photographic art in Buenos Aires”

The exhibition comprised work produced in Germany and London. For a while Stern and Coppola tried operating a studio in Buenos Aires. It didn´t work out and the couple divorced in 1943. After a brief return to England, Stern settled in Argentina to raise a family, her daughter Silvia and her son Andrés.

Among Stern’s most significant accomplishments are her Dreams (Sueños). In 1948 Stern started illustrating women´s dreams for a women’s magazine column titled “El psicoanálisis le ayudará” (“Psychoanalysis will help you”). Over the course of three years Stern created 140 witty photomontages, where she portrayed women’s oppression and submission in Argentine society with sarcastic and surreal images. The photomontage was an ideal way for Stern to express her ideas about the dominant values.

She became a citizen of Argentina in 1958.

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Grete Stern, Dream No. 43: Untitled,  1949 via

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Ringl + Pit, Hat and Gloves, 1930 via

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Grete Stern, Dream via

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 Grete Stern, Dream No. 20: Perspective via

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Grete Stern, Dream No. 46: Estrangement via

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Grete Stern, Dream No. 44: The Accused via

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Grete Stern, Dream No. 13: Consent via

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Grete Stern, Dream No. 41: The Phone Call via

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Grete Stern, Dream via

Amazing Vintage Surreal Glamour by photographer Angus McBean

Angus McBean (8 June 1904 – 9 June 1990) was a Welsh photographer, set designer and cult figure associated with surrealism.

Two figures have prevented McBean from gaining more fame: Cecil Beaton (thanks to his lavish lifestyle and work for Vogue and the British Royal Family); and David Bailey, who much later (1960s) was close to Cecil Beaton both personally and in terms of style.

McBean did not enjoy this level of fame either in his life or after death, even though he was arguably the better technically and artistically.

Additionally McBean’s focus on the world of theatre (particularly London’s West End) did not give him international recognition.

In 2007, seven original colour transparencies (slides) of his photographs for the Beatles album cover Please Please Me by McBean were accidentally thrown in the bin at the headquarters of EMI.

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Marlene Dietrich, “No Highway in the Sky” by Angus Mcbean Pinewood Studios, 1951 via

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Audrey Hepburn by Angus Mcbean via

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Vivien Leigh as Aurora by Angus McBean, 1938 via

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 Hermione Baddeley by Angus McBean, 1938 Gelatin via

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Marika Rivera by Angus Mcbean via

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Dorothy Dickson by Angus Mcbean, 1938 via fotographiaonline.com via

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Beatrice Lillie by Angus McBean, 1940s via