Photos by Visionary Photographer Alvin Langdon Coburn (1882 – 1966)

Alvin Langdon Coburn (1882 – 1966) was an early 20th-century photographer who became a key figure in the development of American pictorialism – the name given to an international style and aesthetic movement that dominated photography during the later 19th and early 20th centuries.

Typically, a pictorial photograph appears to lack a sharp focus (some more so than others), is printed in one or more colors other than black-and-white (ranging from warm brown to deep blue) and may have visible brush strokes or other manipulation of the surface. For the pictorialist, a photograph, like a painting, drawing or engraving, was a way of projecting an emotional intent into the viewer’s realm of imagination

Coburn became the first major photographer to emphasize the visual potential of elevated viewpoints and later made some of the first completely abstract photographs.

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Study – Miss R by Alvin Langdon Coburn, 1904 via

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Landscape by Alvin Langdon Coburn (1902) (Alvin Langdon Coburn/George Eastman House, International Museum of Photography and Film) via

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Vortograph by Alvin Langdon Coburn, 1917 (Alvin Langdon Coburn/George Eastman House, International Museum of Photography and Film) via

Portraits by Gertrude Käsebier (1852–1934)

Gertrude Käsebier (1852–1934) was one of the most influential American photographers of the early 20th century. She was known for her evocative images of motherhood, her powerful portraits of Native Americans and her promotion of photography as a career for women.

Her husband supported her financially when she began to attend art school at the age of thirty-seven, a time when most women of her day were well-settled in their social positions. Käsebier never indicated what motivated her to study art, but she devoted herself to it wholeheartedly.

Throughout the late 1910s and most of the 1920s Käsebier expanded her portrait business, taking photos of many important people of the time including Robert Henri, John Sloan, William Glackens, Arthur B. Davies, Mabel Dodge and Stanford White. In 1924 her daughter Hermine Turner joined her in her portrait business.

In 1929 Käsebier gave up photography altogether and liquidated the contents of her studio. That same year she was given a major one-person exhibition at the Booklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences.

Käsebier died on 12 October 1934 at the home of her daughter, Hermine Turner.

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Miss N (Portrait of Evelyn Nesbit), 1903 by Gertrude Käsebier via

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Girl in Satin Dress with Roses by Gertrude Käsebier (Museum of Fine Arts, Bostonvia

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The Bride by Gertrude Käsebier, 1902 via

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Genevieve Lyon by Gertrude Käsebier, 1914 via

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Portrait of Miss Minnie Ashley by Gertrude Käsebier, 1905 via

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The Magic Crystal, or the Crystal Gazer by Gertrude Käsebier, 1904 via

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Self-Portrait by  Gertrude Käsebier, 1905 via

Emilie Flöge and Gustav Klimt at Litzlberg Attersee (Early 1900s)

Emilie Flöge (1874 – 1952 ) was the life companion of the painter Gustav Klimt (1862 – 1918). In 1891, Helene, the younger sister of Emilie, married Ernst Klimt, the brother of Gustav Klimt. When Ernst died in December 1892, Gustav was made Helene’s guardian. At that time Emilie was eighteen years old and Gustav became a frequent guest at the home of her parents, spending the summers with the Flöge family at Lake Attersee.

Klimt died from a stroke on 11 January 1918. His last words reportedly were, “Get Emilie”. She inherited half of Klimt’s estate, the other half going to the painter’s family.

In the final days of the Second World War, her house in the Ungargasse caught fire, destroying not only her collection of garments, but also valuable objects from the estate of Gustav Klimt.

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Gustav Klimt with Emilie and Hermine Flöge on a jetty in Litzlberg Attersee, 1906 via

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Gustav Klimt and Emilie Flöge, 1900s via

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Emilie Flöge, Gustav Klimt, Therese Flöge, Emma Bacher, Rudolf Schuh and Paul Bach, Litzlberg Attersee, 1904 via

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Rudolf Schuh, Gustav Klimt and Emilie Flöge, Litzlberg Attersee, 1906 via