Stunning Portrait of Marlene Dietrich by Cecil Beaton, 1930

marlene-dietrich-theredlist2

Portrait of Marlene Dietrich by Cecil Beaton, 1930

via

theredlist.com

marlene-dietrich-theredlist3

Portrait of Marlene Dietrich by Cecil Beaton, 1930

via

theredlist.com

Advertisements

Vintage Photos of Bloomsbury Clique Society Hostess Lady Ottoline Morrell

Lady Ottoline Violet Anne Morrell (1873 – 1938) was an English aristocrat and society hostess. She was part of the literary Bloomsbury clique, along with Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West, Lytton Strachey, Clive and Vanessa Bell, E.M. Forster and more.

Perhaps Lady Ottoline’s most interesting literary legacy is the wealth of representations of her that appear in 20th-century literature. She was the inspiration for Mrs Bidlake in Aldous Huxley’s Point Counter Point, for Hermione Roddice in D. H. Lawrence’s Women in Love, for Lady Caroline Bury in Graham Greene’s It’s a Battlefield, and for Lady Sybilline Quarrell in Alan Bennett’s Forty Years On. The Coming Back (1933), another novel which portrays her, was written by Constance Malleson, one of Ottoline’s many rivals for the affection of Bertrand Russell. Some critics consider her the inspiration for Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley. Huxley’s roman à clef, Crome Yellow depicts the life at a thinly-veiled Garsington, one of her estates.

Non-literary portraits are also part of this interesting legacy, for example, as seen in the artistic photographs of her by Cecil Beaton. There are portraits by Henry Lamb, Duncan Grant, Augustus John, and others. Carolyn Heilbrun edited Lady Ottoline’s Album (1976), a collection of snapshots and portraits of Morrell and of her famous contemporaries, mostly taken by Morrell herself.

NPG x144140; Lady Ottoline Morrell by George Charles Beresford

Portrait of Lady Ottoline Morrell by George Charles Beresford, 4 June 1903

via

wordpress.com

cavendish

Lady Ottoline Morrell by Cavendish Morton

platinum print, 1905

via

tumblr.com/

Lady_Ottoline_Morrell_by_Adolf_de_Meyer_circa_1912

Portrait of Lady Ottoline Morrell by Adolf de Meyer, c. 1912

via

wiki

NPG P1008; Lady Ottoline Morrell by Baron Adolph de Meyer

Lady Ottoline Morrell by Baron Adolph de Meyer
platinum print, 1912

via

tumblr.com

NPG x14149; Lady Ottoline Morrell by Cecil Beaton

Lady Ottoline Morrell, by Cecil Beaton (1927)

© Cecil Beaton Studio Archive, Sotheby’s London

via

fenceportal.org

NPG Ax143221; Lady Ottoline Morrell possibly by Lady Ottoline Morrell

Lady Ottoline Morrell, 1929.

via

npg.org.uk

NPG Ax142145; Lady Ottoline Morrell ('Mummy in her bedroom at Amerongen') by Lady Ottoline Morrell

Lady Ottoline Morrell in her bedroom at Amerongen, 1925.

via

tumblr.com

Wallis Simpson in the Lobster Dress

During the 1930s, Wallis Simpson was a frequent subject of Cecil Beaton’s photographs.

Shortly before Wallis’s marriage to the Duke of Windsor in May 1937, Cecil Beaton was asked to take some official photographs of the bride-to-be at the Château de Candé, where she was staying as a guest of Charles Bedeaux.

Since many of the past photographs of Simpson were unflattering, Beaton had a bright idea and suggested more romantic-looking pictures, including an image of her standing in the château’s garden wearing the Schiaparelli Lobster dress. The infamous lobster dress was a design collaboration with Salvador Dalí that grew out of the lobsters that started appearing in the artist’s work in 1934.

Beaton took almost a hundred photographs during the session with Simpson, and Vogue devoted an eight-page spread to the results (source).

 008-duchess-of-windsor-theredlist

 Wallis Simpson in the infamous Schiaparelli dress decorated in the Dali lobster print

by Cecil Beaton (1937)

Wallis+Simpson+in+Lobster+Dress (1)

 Wallis Simpson in the infamous Schiaparelli dress decorated in the Dali lobster print

by Cecil Beaton (1937)

via

24hcoolhunter.com

Marilyn Monroe by Cecil Beaton (1956)

British photographer Cecil Beaton (1904-1980) became famous for his beautiful portraits of Audrey Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe, Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo and Elizabeth Taylor ect.

Although associated with Vogue though most of his career, Beaton’s Monroe portfolio appeared in Harper’s Bazaar, for whom he worked in the mid 1950s. It was whilst in New York for the rehearsals and premiere of My Fair Lady that Beaton photographed Monroe. With a possibility that he would be the designer of Monroe’s dresses for The Prince and The Showgirl, Beaton arranged a photography sitting in his suite in the Ambassador Hotel on 22 February 1956. Pfizenmaier, Beaton’s assistant, noted that Monroe did her own make-up and ‘came just by herself, with these two little dresses… it was as simple as that.’ Beaton recalled ‘She romps, she squeals with delight, she leaps on the sofa. She puts a flower stem in her mouth… It is an artless, impromptu, high-spirited, infectiously gay performance. It will probably end in tears.’ The session produced one of Monroe’s favourite portraits which hung in her New York apartment that she shared with her third husband Arthur Miller (source).

Cecil_Beaton_6-original

Marilyn Monroe by Cecil Beaton

via

moicani.fr

marbird

Marilyn Monroe by Cecil Beaton

via

livejournal.com

marbeat

Marilyn Monroe by Cecil Beaton (copyright protected by the respective owner)

via

thisismarilyn.com

the-world-of-old-photography-cecil-beaton-marilyn-monroe-1956-1397245796_b.png

Marilyn Monroe by Cecil Beaton (copyright protected by the respective owner)

via

pictify.com

marbeat1

Marilyn Monroe by Cecil Beaton (copyright protected by the respective owner)

via

thisismarilyn.com

Beaton Sir Cecil Marilyn Monroe 2 C Cecil Beaton Studio Archive Sotheby s London

Marilyn Monroe by Cecil Beaton

via

moicani.fr

axelp-20090615113956-Cecil_Beaton_14-original

Marilyn Monroe by Cecil Beaton

via

moicani.fr

Nancy Cunard (1896 –1965) – African Influenced Fashion Muse

Nancy Cunard was a writer, heiress and political activist. She was born into the British upper class and devoted much of her life to fighting racism and fascism. In 1928 Cunard had become romantically involved with African-American jazz musician Henry Crowder. They lived in an apartment in Harlem together, which prompted outraged tabloid headlines on both sides of the Atlantic.

About this time she became seriously interested in African art and culture.

Her style became informed by her devotion to the artifacts of the same culture. This was startlingly unconventional at the time. The large-scale jewelry she favored, crafted of wood, bone and ivory, the natural materials used by native crafts people, was provocative and controversial. The trademark bangles she wore on both arms snaking from wrist to elbow were considered outré adornments, which provoked media attention, visually compelling subject matter for photographers of the day.

She was often photographed wearing her collection, those of African inspiration and neckpieces of wooden cubes, which paid homage to the concepts of Cubism. At first considered the bohemian affectation of an eccentric heiress, the fashion world came to legitimize this style as avant-garde, dubbing it the “barbaric look.”

Nancy Cunard 1926 by Man Ray

via

metmuseum.org

Nancy Cunard by Cecil Beaton

via

beatricebrandini.it

nance4

Man Ray, Tristan Tzara kneeling to kiss Nancy Cunard’s hand, Bal du Comte de Beaumont, 1924

via

tumblr.com

Nancy Cunard by Cecil Beaton, 1929. © Cecil Beaton Studio Archive, Sotheby’s London.

via

npg.org.uk

nancy

Nancy Cunard

via

fashioneditoratlarge.com

Elsa Schiaparelli – Mad & Original Fashion designer

Elsa Schiaparelli couldn’t sew and she didn’t sketch, yet she stormed Paris fashion in the 1920s and 1930s.  Along with Coco Chanel, her greatest rival, she is regarded as one of the most prominent figures in fashion between the two World Wars. While her contemporaries Chanel and Vionnet set the period’s standards of taste and beauty in fashion design, Schiaparelli flouted convention in the pursuit of a more idiosyncratic style. Her designs were heavily influenced by Surrealists and she Invented the power shoulders, the wedge shoes, the jumpsuit, and the color shocking pink and inspired a generation of unconventional couturiers.

Madder and more original than most of her contemporaries, Mme Schiaparelli is the one to whom the word ‘genius’ is applied most often.

Time magazine wrote of its cover subject in 1934. Of her contemporaries she described Chanel as “that milliner”, while Chanel once dismissed her rival as ‘that Italian artist who makes clothes”.

She came from a privileged background and was born at the Palazzo Corsini in Rome in 1890. Her mother, Maria-Luisa, was a Neapolitan aristocrat, and her father, Celestino Schiaparelli, was a renowned scholar and curator of medieval manuscripts. Her father was Dean of the University of Rome and an authority on Sanskrit. She was a niece of astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli, who discovered the so-called canali of Mars, and she spent hours with him studying the heavens. She studied philosophy at the University of Rome, during which she published a book of sensual poems that shocked her conservative family. Schiaparelli was sent to a convent until she went on hunger strike and at the age of 22 accepted a job in London as a nanny. Elsa led a refined life with a certain amount of luxury provided by her parents’ wealth and high social status. She believed, however, that this luxury was stifling to her art and creativity and so she removed herself from the “lap of luxury” as quickly as possible. Schiaparelli moved first to New York City and then to Paris, combining her love of art and design to become a couturier

Elsa Schiaparelli, by Cecil Beaton, 1930s - NPG x40358 - © Cecil Beaton Studio Archive, Sotheby's London

Elsa Schiaparelli by Cecil Beaton 1930s

via

Npg

https://i0.wp.com/www.urbankaleidoscope.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/UrbanKaleidoscopeElsiedeWolfe20.jpg

Interior designer Elsie de Wolfe wearing a Schiaparelli sequined cape

via

1938 – Marlene Dietrich wearing a Schiaparelli-designed hat.

via

Vogue UK

Sciaparelli  Hat

via

Pinterest

elsaglass

Model and store mannequin at Elsa Schiaparelli’s store, photo by Regina Relang, Paris, 1951

via

Tumblr