Beautiful Elizabeth Taylor in historical film Beau Brummell (1954)

George Bryan “Beau” Brummell (1778 – 1840) was an iconic figure in Regency England, the arbiter of men’s fashion, and a friend of the Prince Regent, the future King George IV.

Beau Brummell is a 1954 American-British historical film released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. According to MGM records the film earned $1,049,000 in the US and $1,652,000 elsewhere. It made a loss of $383,000.

However, in recent years the film has attained a considerable cult status and popularity, largely because of the story of British high society in the colorful Napoleonic and Regency Eras and because of memorable performances by Granger, Taylor, Ustinov and Morley as “Mad King George III”.

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Elizabeth Taylor by Virgil Apger in “Beau Brummell” directed by Curtis Bernhardt, 1954 via

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Elizabeth Taylor by Virgil Apger in “Beau Brummell” directed by Curtis Bernhardt, 1954 via

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Elizabeth Taylor by Virgil Apger in “Beau Brummell” directed by Curtis Bernhardt, 1954 via

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Elizabeth Taylor by Virgil Apger in “Beau Brummell” directed by Curtis Bernhardt, 1954 via

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Elizabeth Taylor by Virgil Apger on the set of “Beau Brummell” directed by Curtis Bernhardt, 1954 via

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Elizabeth Taylor by Virgil Apger on the set of “Beau Brummell” directed by Curtis Bernhardt, 1954 via

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Elizabeth Taylor by Virgil Apger in “Beau Brummell” directed by Curtis Bernhardt, 1954 via

Vintage Photos of Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse (1958)

Bonjour Tristesse (“Hello, Sadness”) is a 1958 British-American Technicolor film in CinemaScope, directed and produced by Otto Preminger from a screenplay by Arthur Laurents based on the novel of the same title by Françoise Sagan.

A Guardian piece in 2012 described it as:

“an example of Hollywood’s golden age, and both its star and its famously tyrannical director are ripe for rediscovery.”

The film stars Jean Seberg as Cécile, a decadent young girl who lives with her rich playboy father, Raymond (David Niven). Anne (Deborah Kerr), a mature and cultured friend of Raymond’s late wife, arrives at Raymond’s villa for a visit.

Cécile is afraid that Anne will disrupt the undisciplined way of life that she has shared with her father, so she does her best to break up the relationship with Anne.

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Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse directed by Otto Preminger, 1958 via

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Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse directed by Otto Preminger, 1958 via

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Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse directed by Otto Preminger, 1958 via

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Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse directed by Otto Preminger, 1958 via

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Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse directed by Otto Preminger, 1958 via

 

Vintage Photos of Sue Lyon on the set of “The night of the Iguana” (1964)

The Night of the Iguana is a 1964 film based on the 1961 play of the same name written by Tennessee Williams.

The film grossed $12 million worldwide at the box office, earning $4.5 million in US theatrical rentals. It was the 10th highest-grossing film of 1964. Time magazine’s reviewer wrote:

“Huston and company put together a picture that excites the senses, persuades the mind, and even occasionally speaks to the spirit—one of the best movies ever made from a Tennessee Williams play.”

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Sue Lyon on the set of The night of the iguana directed by John Huston, 1964. Photo by Gjon Mili via

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Director John Huston and Sue Lyon on the set of The night of the iguana, 1964. Photo by Gjon Mili via

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Director John Huston and Sue Lyon on the set of The night of the iguana, 1964. Photo by Gjon Mili via

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Sue Lyon and Hampton Fancher on the set of The night of the iguana directed by John Huston, 1964. Photo by Gjon Mili via

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Sue Lyon and Hampton Fancher on the set of The night of the iguana directed by John Huston, 1964. Photo by Gjon Mili via

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Sue Lyon on the set of The night of the iguana directed by John Huston, 1964. Photo by Gjon Mili via

Vintage Photos of Brigitte Bardot on the Film Set of “Le Mépris” (1963)

Le Mépris or Contempt is a 1963 French-Italian drama film written and directed by Jean-Luc Godard, based on the Italian novel Il disprezzo (A Ghost at Noon) by Alberto Moravia.

It stars Brigitte Bardot as Camille Javal, the wife of Paul Javal (Michel Piccoli), a young French playwright who has found commercial success in Rome, and accepts an offer from vulgar American producer Jeremy Prokosch (Jack Palance) to rework the script for German director Fritz Lang’s screen adaptation of The Odyssey.

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Brigitte Bardot on the set of Le Mépris directed by Jean-Luc Godard, 1963. Photo by Tazio Secchiaroli via

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Brigitte Bardot on the set of Le Mépris directed by Jean-Luc Godard, 1963. Photo by Tazio Secchiaroli via

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Brigitte Bardot on the set of Le Mépris directed by Jean-Luc Godard, 1963. Photo by Tazio Secchiaroli via

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Le Mépris directed by Jean-Luc Godard, 1963. Photo by Tazio Secchiaroli via

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Le Mépris directed by Jean-Luc Godard, 1963. Photo by Tazio Secchiaroli via

Tippi Hedren and Alfred Hitchcock on the set of The Birds (1963)

1963 horror thriller “The Birds” features the screen debut of Tippi Hedren. Hitchcock told a reporter, after a few weeks of filming, that she was remarkable, and said:

“She’s already reaching the lows and highs of terror”.

The film is loosely based on the 1952 story by Daphne du Maurier. It is set primarily in Bodega Bay, California which is, suddenly and for unexplained reasons, the subject of a series of widespread and violent bird attacks over the course of a few days.

The film was written by author and screenwriter Evan Hunter. Hitchcock told him to develop new characters and a more elaborate plot, keeping du Maurier’s title and concept of unexplained bird attacks.

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Alfred Hitchcock and Tippi Hedren filming The Birds. Photograph: Ronald Grant Archive via

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Tippi Hedren with Hitchcock filming The Birds via

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Tippi Hedren talks to director Alfred Hitchcock while sitting on his chair on the set of The Birds via