Wedding of Pola Negri and Prince Serge Mdivani (1927)

Pola Negri (1897 – 1987) was a Polish stage and film actress who achieved worldwide fame during the silent and golden eras of Hollywood and European film for her tragedienne and femme fatale roles. She was reportedly Valentino’s lover until his death in 1926 – at the time of his death and for the remainder of her life, Negri would claim Valentino was the love of her life.

Negri and Princw Serge Mdivani were married on 14 May 1927 (less than nine months after Valentino’s death); they were married in the little hamlet of Seraincourt in. When she lost her fortune in the Stock Market Crash of 1929, he abandoned her and took up with opera singer Mary McCormic, who divorced him in a highly publicized trial.

pola-negri1

Pola and Serge in their wedding day 4 May 1927 via

img0000904A

Photo Shows Pola and Serge, with Prince Gregory Mdivani (center), father of the Groom, and Mr. Clifford B. Harmon, the best Man, at the right, in back of the Groom, shortly after the ceremony was performed via

pola-negri2

Pola and Serge in their wedding day 4 May 1927 via

Ernest Hemingway & Elizabeth Hadley Richardson Wedding (1921)

Ernest Hemingway and Elizabeth Hadley Richardson married after a courtship of less than a year, on September 3th 1921, in Horton Bay, Michigan. Hedley was 8 years older than Ernest, and the first of his four wives. Bernice Kert, author of The Hemingway Women, claims Hadley was “evocative” of the woman whom Hemingway met and fell in love with during his recuperation from injuries during World War I, Agnes von Kurowsky, but in Hadley, Hemingway saw a childishness Agnes lacked.

The couple spent their honeymoon at the Hemingway family summer cottage on Walloon Lake. The weather was miserable, and both Hadley and Hemingway came down with fever, sore throat, and cough. The couple returned to Chicago after their honeymoon, but within months they moved to Paris, where he worked as a foreign correspondent and fell under the influence of the modernist writers and artists of the 1920s “Lost Generation” expatriate community.

Of Hemingway’s marriage to Hadley, Hemingway biographer Jeffrey Meyers claims: “With Hadley, Hemingway achieved everything he had hoped for with Agnes:

“the love of a beautiful woman, a comfortable income, a life in Europe.”

Their marriage disintegrated as Hemingway was writing and revising The Sun Also Rises.  In 1925 Hadley became aware of Hemingway´s affair with American journalist Pauline Pfeiffer. The couple divorced in January 1927, and Hemingway married Pfeiffer in May the same year. In 1933 Hadley married a second time, to journalist Paul Mowrer, whom she met in Paris.

hemingway3

Hadley on her wedding day in 1921 via

hemingway2

Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley, on their wedding day in 1921 via

hemingway

Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley, on their wedding day in 1921 via

The Glamorous Wedding Of Cornelia Vanderbilt & John Cecil (1924)

Cornelia Stuyvesant Vanderbilt (1900-1976) was born at the famous Biltmore Estate, a large (8,000 acre) private estate  in Asheville, North Carolina. Biltmore House, the main house on the estate, is a Châteauesque-styled mansion built by George Washington Vanderbilt II between 1889 and 1895 and is the largest privately owned house in the United States, at 178,926 square feet (16,622.8 m2)  of floor space (135,280 square feet (12,568 m2) of living area).

Cornelia was the only child of George Washington Vanderbilt and Edith Dresser Vanderbilt. Cornelia inherited the Biltmore Estate from her father.

Cornelia was married first to Hon John Francis Amherst Cecil in 1924. About 1932, Cornelia found life at Biltmore too dull to endure and moved to New York briefly to study art. After a few months she moved to Paris, divorced Cecil in 1934, changed her name to Nilcha and dyed her hair bright pink. That phase passed, and while living quietly and modestly in London, she met and married Vivian Francis Bulkely-Johnson about 1950.

At some point she adopted the name Mary. Her last marriage was in 1972 to William Goodsir, 26 years her junior. They lived very quietly; Cornelia never spoke of her past.
Her sons with Cecil, George Henry Vanderbilt Cecil (b. 1925) and William Amherst Vanderbilt Cecil (b. 1928), eventually inherited the Biltmore Estate and land (source).

Cornelia V.

Cornelia Vanderbilt in her official wedding portrait, 1924 via

vanderc

Cornelia Vanderbilt, 1924 via

C. Vanderbilt

Cornelia Vanderbilt, 1924 via

c. vanderbilt1

Cornelia Stuyvesant Vanderbilt and John Francis Amherst Cecil, 1924 via

corneliaV2

Cornelia Vanderbilt and John Francis Amherst Cecil, 1924 via

leaving

Cornelia Vanderbilt and John Francis Amherst Cecil, 1924 via

 

Royal Bride Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon Leaving For Westminster Abbey (1923)

The wedding of Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (later Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother) and Prince Albert, Duke of York (later King George VI), took place on 26 April 1923 at Westminster Abbey.

Lady Elizabeth was attended by eight bridesmaids. Her wedding dress was made from deep ivory chiffon moire, embroidered with pearls and a silver thread.

In an unexpected and unprecedented gesture, Elizabeth laid her bouquet at the Tomb of The Unknown Warrior on her way into the Abbey, in memory of her brother Fergus. Ever since, the bouquets of subsequent royal brides have traditionally been laid at the tomb, though after the wedding ceremony rather than before.

Duchess Bride

Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923 via

lizwed23

Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923  via

lizw23

Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923 via

lw23

Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923 via

Wedding of Duke of York and Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon at Westminster Abbey London.