1950s Supermodel Bettina in Jacques Fath

Simone Micheline Bodin (1925-2015), known professionally as Bettina or Bettina Graziani, became one of the century’s first supermodels, rivalled in the forties only by the “English beauty” Barbara Goalen. Before becoming a model she was described as:

“…a freckle-faced rail worker’s daughter from Brittany”

She was renamed and recreated by Jacques Fath, who told her:

“We already have a Simone; you look to me like a Bettina”

Bettina was invited by Christian Dior to join his fashion house which she refused, choosing instead to work for Fath.

003-jacques-fath

Jacques Fath in studio with Bettina Graziani, 1950 via

015-jacques-fath

Bettina Graziani in Jacques Fath Dress, 1949 via

Amazing Double Images of Suzy Parker by Gjon Mili (1948)

suzy_parker2

Gjon Mili, double image of Suzy Parker modelling skirt, jacket & hat in fabric printed to look like ocelot, New York, 1948  via

suzy_parker1

Gjon Mili, double image of Suzy Parker modelling skirt, jacket & hat in fabric printed to look like ocelot, New York, 1948 via

Jean Patchett at the Museum of Modern Art by Nina Leen (1948)

Jean Patchett (1926 – 2002) was a leading fashion model of the late 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s. She was among the best known models of that era, which included Dovima, Dorian Leigh, Suzy Parker, Evelyn Tripp and Lisa Fonssagrives.

She was famous for being one of the first high-fashion models to appear remote; previously, models had appeared warm and friendly.

During her career, she appeared on over 40 magazine covers. Patchett modeled for brands including Bergdorf Goodman, Henri Bendel and Revlon.

jean_patchett1.jpeg

Nina Leen, Jean Patchett, Life, 1949 via

jean_patchett.jpeg

Nina Leen, Jean Patchett, Life, 1949 via

jean_patchett2

Nina Leen, Jean Patchett, Life, 1949 via

jean_patchett3

Nina Leen, Jean Patchett, Life, 1949 via

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip Wedding Photos (1947)

windsor1

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip wedding photos, November 20, 1947 via

Royal anniversary

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip wedding photos, November 20, 1947 via

Amazing Fashion Photography by Lillian Bassman

Lillian Bassman (1917–2012) was a photographer, art director, and painter best known for her work in fashion photography.

Bassman wanted to be a dancer, but an injury to her heel crushed that hope. Instead, she attended a vocational high school and studied textile design. She graduated in 1933.

From the 1940s until the 1960s Bassman worked as a fashion photographer for Junior Bazaar and later at Harper’s Bazaar where she promoted the careers of photographers such as Richard Avedon, Robert Frank, Louis Faurer and Arnold Newman. Under the guidance of the Russian emigrant, Alexey Brodovitch, she began to photograph her model subjects primarily in black and white. Her work was published for the most part in Harper’s Bazaar from 1950 to 1965.

By the 1970s Bassman’s interest in pure form in her fashion photography was out of vogue. She turned to her own photo projects and abandoned fashion photography. In doing so she tossed out 40 years of negatives and prints – her life’s work. A forgotten bag filled with hundreds of images was discovered over 20 years later. Bassman’s fashion photographic work began to be re-appreciated in the 1990s.

The most notable qualities about her photographic work are the high contrasts between light and dark, the graininess of the finished photos, and the geometric placement and camera angles of the subjects. Bassman became one of the last great woman photographers in the world of fashion.

 

Lillian Bassman via

Lillian Bassman. Barbara Mullen (Blowing Kiss VARIANT), Harper’s Bazaar via

bass

Lillian Bassman. More Fashion Mileage per Dress, Barbara Vaughn, New York via

bass2

Lillian Bassman. Southwest Passage – Sunset Pink: Model unknown, pajamas via

Lillian Bassman via

Lillian Bassman, wedding dress via

Lillian Bassman. Fantasy on the Dance Floor: Barbara Mullen in a Christian Dior Dress, Paris. Harper’s Bazaar, 1949 via

Lillian Bassman via

Amazing Vintage Fashion Photography by George Platt Lynes (1940s)

George Platt Lynes (April 15, 1907 – December 6, 1955) was an American fashion and commercial photographer who worked in the 1930s and 1940s.

He developed close friendships within a larger circle of artists including Jean Cocteau and Julien Levy, the art dealer and critic. Levy would exhibit his photographs in his gallery in New York City in 1932 and Lynes would open his studio there that same year.

He was soon receiving commissions from Harper’s Bazaar, Town & Country, and Vogue including a cover with perhaps the first supermodel, Lisa Fonssagrives

platt0

George Platt Lynes, Untitled, 1940s via

platt1.jpg

George Platt Lynes, Lisa Fonssagrives for Marshall Field, 1940 via

platt2

George Platt Lynes, Lisa for Henri Bendel, 1940-41 via

platt3-e1515088909250.jpg

George Platt Lynes, Evelyn Tripp, 1948 via

platt6

George Platt Lynes, Fashion model in Lincoln Kirstein’s appartement, with Elie Nadelman sculpture, 1948 via

platt5

George Platt Lynes, Untitled, 1940s via

platt7.jpg

George Platt Lynes, Madame Grès, Evening gown with peplum, silk jersey, 1940 via

Claire McCardell Wearing Amazing Dresses of Her Own Creation (1945)

Claire McCardell (May 24, 1905 – 1958) was an American fashion designer in the arena of ready-to-wear clothing in the 20th century. She is credited with the creation of American sportswear.

In 1942, McCardell created her famed “Popover Dress.” It was a response to a Harper’s Bazaar challenge to create something fashionable you could wear to clean the house and then wear to a cocktail party. The simple grey dress came with a matching potholder which fit into the dress’s pocket. The “Popover Dress” sold for $6.95 and over 75,000 were sold in the first season alone.

These dresses became a staple of McCardells collections and over time she made version in different lengths and fabrics. The “Popover Dress” received a citation from the American Fashion Critics Association and in 1943, McCardell won a Coty Award.

Beginning in 1945, McCardell was featured as an “American Look” designer by Lord & Taylor’s department store.  In 1946, McCardell won the Best Sportswear Designer Award and in 1948 she won the Neiman-Marcus Award.

072-claire-mccardell-theredlist

Claire McCardell in a Dress of her creation, 1945 via

031-claire-mccardell-theredlist

Claire McCardell in a Dress of her creation, 1945 via

006-claire-mccardell-theredlist

Claire McCardell in her Futuristic Dress (cut only of triangles), photographed by Erwin Blumenfeld, 1945 via