Fashion Photography by Norman Parkinson (1950s)

From his early days as a photographer up to his death Norman Parkinson remained one of the foremost British portrait and fashion photographers. His work, following the lead of Martin Munkacsi at Harper’s Bazaar, revolutionised the world of British fashion photography in the 1940s by bringing his models from the rigid studio environment into a far more dynamic outdoor setting. Humour played a central role in many of his photographs which often included himself.

From 1935 to 1940 he worked for Harper’s Bazaar and Bystander magazines. During the Second World War he served as a reconnaissance photographer over France for the Royal Air Force. In 1947 he married the actress and model Wenda Rogerson. From 1945 to 1960 he was employed as a portrait and fashion photographer for Vogue.  

norman2

Norman Parkinson via

norman1

Norman Parkinson Zulu War Dance, British Vogue, 1951 via

norman-parkinson-wenda-and-ostriches-south-africa-for-vogue-1951

 Ms Wenda Rogerson shot for Vogue, South Africa, 1951 © Norman Parkinson. Courtesy Norman Parkinson Archive, normanparkinson.com via

Norman Parkinson (3)

Anne Gunning in dress by Susan Small, photo by Norman Parkinson (India feature) for Vogue UK, Dec 1956 via

norman4

Barbara Mullen. Delhi, India, November 1956 via

Norman Parkinson (6)

Carmen dell Orefice, Vogue, July, 1959 via

Beautiful Vintage Millinery by Lilly Daché (1898 – 1989)

Lilly Daché (1898 – 1989) was a French milliner and fashion designer. During her career she was the most famous milliner in the United States.

In her native France, Lilly Daché was considered (by her mother, no less) a homely child. Lilly’s thin, strong face with its green cat’s eyes and framing of straight red hair were deemed ugly. Not too surprisingly, little Lilly turned to adornment to amend her failings: braiding cherries into her hair & making hats from grape leaves. Her passion creating beauty took her to Paris to study hatmaking (after all, as Lilly says, if your hat is correct, it can compensate for a world of faults).

Lilly Daché designed for Hollywood films and had many clients who were movie-stars. International star Maria Montez loved her Lillys so much, she created a scene at Chicago’s Union Station when she discovered 2 of her 8 Daché hatboxes were missing. Never mind that she was being reunited with her medal-strewn soldier-husband whom she hadn’t seen for a year–Maria had bigger fish to fry. “I want my Daché hats!” she stormed after briefly smiling for the photographers.

Her designs and hats are valued highly by collectors of vintage clothes. Both the designer Halston and the hair stylist Kenneth worked for her before going into business for themselves.

Lily_Dache_checking_out_her_hat_design

Lily Dache checking out her hat design via

Hats

Hat by Lilly Daché via

mullen-lilly

Barbara Mullen wearing a headpiece by Lilly Daché, New York, 1951. Photo by Richard Avedon via

Hats4

Hat by Lilly Daché via

Annex - Miranda, Carmen_03

Carmen Miranda wearing hat/turban by Lilly Daché via