Vintage Photos of Performance Artist Emmy Hennings (1885-1948)

Emmy Hennings (born Emma Maria Cordsen, 1885 – 1948) was a performer and poet. She was also the wife of celebrated Dadaist Hugo Ball.

Hennings and Ball moved to Zurich in 1915, where they took part in the founding of the Cabaret Voltaire, which marked the beginning of the Dada movement. Hennings was a regular performer at the Cabaret Voltaire. Her performances included a role in Das Leben des Menschen (the Life of a Man), in which she appeared with Ball.

In The Magic Bishop: Hugo Ball, Dada Poet, author Erdmute Wenzel White writes that Hennings “was admired by expressionists as the incarnation of the cabaret artist of her time… The shining star of the Voltaire, according to the Zuricher Post (Zurich Post), her role in Dada has not been adequately acknowledged.

After the Cabaret Voltaire ended, Hennings and Ball toured, performing mostly in hotels. Hennings sang, did puppetry, and danced to music composed by Ball. She also recited her own poetry. In 1916 Ball and Hennings created Arabella, their own ensemble troupe, where Hennings performed under the name Dagny.

Hennings married Ball on 21 February 1920. Although they had no children together, Hennings had a daughter, Annemarie, from a previous relationship. Hennings, who outlived Ball by two decades, lived in Magliaso, Switzerland from 1942 to 1948. She died at a clinic in Sorengo, Switzerland.

Emmy Hennings been almost completely erased from the history of the Dada movement. This was due to her own inner conflict, her extreme practice of Catholicism contrasting with her debauched bohemian lifestyle but also because of her constant rewriting of her story and that of Hugo Ball during the latter part of her life. Dada artists and historians thus preferred to eclipse the role Emmy Hennings and turned her into a naive eccentric adorned by a childish bob haircut (source).

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Emmy Hennings and her dada puppets, 1916 via

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Emmy Hennings, 1910-1913 via

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Emmy Hennings with her friends for Revolution Ball of “Action”, 1915 via

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Emmy Hennings, 1915 via

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Emmy Hennings, 1917-1918

Famous Flappers of the Roaring Twenties

Flappers were a “new breed” of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.

Flappers had their origins in the liberal period of the Roaring Twenties, the social, political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of World War I, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe.

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Zelda Fitzgerald was an American socialite and novelist, and the wife of American author F. Scott Fitzgerald, who dubbed her “the first American Flapper”. She and Scott became the emblem of the Jazz Age, for which they are still celebrated via

1926: Hollywood film star, Clara Bow (1905 - 1965) in a shiny strapless dress. (Photo by Eugene Robert Richee)

Clara Bow epitomized the Roaring Twenties’ flapper. At only 25, she retired exhausted by repeated scandals about her presumed sexual life. Photo: Bow in a shiny strapless dress by Eugene Robert Richee, 1926 via

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 Coleen Moore was Bow´s “chief rival”. After Bow took the stage Moore gradually lost her momentum. In spring 1924 she made a good, but unsuccessful effort to top Bow in The Perfect Flapper, and soon after she dismissed the whole flapper vogue. Photo: Coleen Moore in “Why Be Good?”, 1929 via

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Louise Brooks 1920. She was an American dancer and actress noted as an iconic symbol of the flapper, and for popularizing the bobbed haircut via

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Gilda Gray, 1924. She was an American actress and dancer who popularized a dance called the “shimmy” which became fashionable in 1920s films and theater productions via

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Tallulah Brockman, 1922. Bankhead was an American actress of the stage and screen, and a reputed libertine britannica.com

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Anita Loos was an American screenwriter, playwright and author, best known for her blockbuster comic novel, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes first published in 1925. It was one of several famous novels published that year that chronicled the so-called Jazz Age – including Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Photo: Loos, on page 12 of the April 1922 Photoplay via

A Collection of Vintage Photos Feat. the Glamorous Fashion & Style of the 192Os

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Clara Bow

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Gloria Swanson in the Queen Kelly, 1929

 Josephine Baker

Josephine baker´s Eton crop haircut

1920s flapper Louise Brooks

Louise Brooks short bobbed flapper hair

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Marion Morehouse in Chanel. Photo by Edward Steichen, Vogue, 1926

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Norma Shearer giving thanks for her amazing wardrobe collection in A Slave to Fashion, 1925

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Bebe Daniels with a tiger, 1927

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1920s icon Gilda Gray looking very glamorous

Bloomer-esque short pants and a jaunty monocle, what's not to adore? (Image 1927-1928.) #vintage #1920s #fashion

1920s girl with monocle

1920s style

A Collection of Vintage Photos feat. Lya de Putti

Lya De Putti (1897 – 1931) was a Hungarian film actress of the silent era, noted for her portrayal of vampcharacters.

She began her stage career on the Hungarian Vaudeville circuit. She soon progressed to Berlin, where after performing in the ballet, she made her screen debut in 1918. She became the premiere danseuse at the Berlin Winter Garden in 1924.

Around that time German film director Jol Mai noticed her and cast her in her first important film, The Mistress of the World. She followed this success with noteworthy performances in Manon Lescaut and Varieté (1925).

The actress came to America in February 1926. At the time she told reporters she was twenty-two years old. Her ocean liner’s records list her as having been twenty-six. De Putti was generally cast as a vamp character, and often wore her dark hair short, in a style similar to that of Louise Brooks or Colleen Moore.

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Lya De Putti via

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Lya De Putti via

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Lya De Putti in The Prince of Tempters, 1926 via

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Lya De Putti by Alexander Binder for the film Manon Lescaut, 1926, UFA Universum-Film via

Vintage Photos of Jazz Age Trio “The Brox Sisters”

The Brox Sisters were an American trio of singing sisters, enjoying their greatest popularity in the 1920s and early 1930s. The sisters were: Lorayne (born Eunice 1901 – 1993) Bobbe (born Josephine Brock 1902 – 1999) & Patricia (born Kathleen 1904 – 1988).

The family name “Brock” was changed to “Brox” for theater marquees. The trio grew up in Tennessee and retained Southern accents during their performing careers.

They began in the 1910s touring the Vaudeville circuit in the United States and Canada. At the start of the 1920s they achieved success in New York on the Broadway stage. Near the end of the decade they relocated to Los Angeles.

The act broke up in the early 1930s after the sisters got married. They made their final professional reunion appearance on radio in 1939.

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The Brox Sisters © 2016 James Abbe Archive via

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Darby and Brox sisters via

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The Brox Sisters, 1923  via

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The Brox Sisters and the Rhythm Boys in King of Jazz, 1930 via