Hedy Lamarr in Samson and Delilah (1949)

Samson and Delilah is a 1949 American romantic biblical drama film produced and directed by Cecil B. DeMille and released by Paramount Pictures. It depicts the biblical story of Samson, a strongman whose secret lies in his uncut hair, and his love for Delilah, the woman who seduces him, discovers his secret, and then betrays him to the Philistines. It stars Hedy Lamarr and Victor Mature in the title roles, George Sanders as the Saran, Angela Lansbury as Semadar, and Henry Wilcoxon as Ahtur.

At the 23rd Academy Awards on March 29, 1951, Samson and Delilah won for Best Color Art Direction (art directors Hans Dreier and Walter H. Tyler and set decorators Samuel M. Comer and Ray Moyer) and Best Color Costume Design (Edith Head, Dorothy Jeakins, Elois Jenssen, Gile Steele, and Gwen Wakeling)

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Hedy Lamarr in Samson and Delilah, 1949 via

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Hedy Lamarr in Samson and Delilah, 1949 via

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Hedy Lamarr in Samson and Delilah, 1949 via

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Hedy Lamarr in Samson and Delilah, 1949 via

Gloria Swanson in Don’t Change Your Husband

Don’t Change Your Husband is a 1919 American silent comedy film directed by Cecil B. DeMille and starring Gloria Swanson. The film was the third of six “marriage films” directed by DeMille and the first DeMille film starring Gloria Swanson.

Based upon a description in a film magazine, Leila Porter (Swanson) has grown tired of her husband James Denby Porter (Elliott Dexter), the glue king, as she is romantic but he is prosaic.

Moreover, he is careless of his personal appearance, gets cigar ash in the carpet, and eats green onions before he tries to kiss her.

She obtains a divorce and then marries James’ friend Schuyler Van Sutphen (Lew Cody), but discovers that Van Sutphen is a real beast.

When she later discovers that her ex-husband has changed as a result of the divorce, still loves her, and would be happy to have her back, Leila divorces once again in order to remarry James.

Don’t Change Your Husband was a watershed film for Gloria. It opened in January and was held over for two weeks in New York, which was unheard of at the time.

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Gloria Swanson in a production still from Don’t Change Your Husband, 1919 via

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Gloria Swanson in Don’t Change Your Husband, 1919 via

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Gloria Swanson & Lew Cody in Don’t Change Your Husband, 1919 via

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Gloria Swanson & Elliott Dexter in Don’t Change Your Husband, 1919 via

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Gloria Swanson in Don’t Change Your Husband, 1919 via

Gloria Swanson in “Male and Female” by Arthur F. Kales (1919)

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Arthur F. Kales, Gloria Swanson in “Male and Female” directed by Cecil B. DeMille, 1919 via

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Arthur F. Kales, Gloria Swanson in “Male and Female” directed by Cecil B. DeMille, 1919 via