A Collection of Photos Feat. Old Hollywood Costumes by Travis Banton

Travis Banton (1894 – 1958) was the chief designer at Paramount Pictures. He is considered one of the most important Hollywood costume designers of the 1930s.

An early apprenticeship with a high-society costume dressmaker earned him fame. When Mary Pickford selected one of his dresses for her wedding to Douglas Fairbanks, his reputation was established.

He opened his own dressmaking salon in New York City, and soon was asked to create costumes for the Ziegfeld Follies. In 1924, Travis Banton moved to Hollywood when Paramount contracted with him to create costumes for his first film, The Dressmaker from Paris.

Glamour, understated elegance, and exquisite fabrics endeared Travis Banton to the most celebrated of Hollywood’s beauties and made him one of the most sought-after costume designers of his era.

Because of his alcoholism and reputedly also at the instigation of his subordinate Edith Head, Banton was forced to leave Paramount. He started his own business and also designed for Twentieth Century-Fox from 1939-1941 and Universal from 1945-1948.

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Marlene Dietrich in “The Devil is a Woman,” 1935. Costume by Travis Banton via

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Claudette Colbert in “Tonight is Ours” 1933, costume by Travis Banton via

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Anna May Wong in “Limehouse Blues” 1934, costume by Travis Banton via

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Lucille Ball in “Lover Come Back” 1946, costume by Travis Banton via

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Carole Lombard in “Rumba”, 1935. Costume by Travis Banton via

Vintage Photographs of Amazing Movie Wedding Dresses

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Claudette Colbert. It Happened One Night, 1934 via

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Olivia de Havilland. They Died With Their Boots On, 1941 via

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Joan Fontaine. Jane Eyre, 1943 via

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Gene Tierney 1946. The Razor’s Edge, 1946 via

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Audrey Hepburn. Funny Face, 1957 via

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Marilyn Monroe. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953 via

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Gina Lollobrigida. Come September, 1961 via

Old Hollywood Photos by Irving “Lippy” Lippman

Irving Isadore Lippman (1906 – 2006) was born in Edendale, California to Samuel and Celia Lippman, who emigrated from Russia in the late 1800’s. “Lippy,” as he was affectionately called spent 60 years in the film industry beginning as a sixteen-year old assistant camerman on a silent era comedy directed by Fatty Arbuckle in 1922 for $25 per week.

Lippman held various jobs and titles during his tenure in the business from still photographer and film director to cinematographer. He photographed and caught on film such beauties as Mae West, Rita Hayworth, Marilyn Monroe, Joan Crawford, Ginger Rogers, Jean Arthur, Claudette Colbert and Barbara Stanwyck

His last service to the industry was as cinematographer on Love Boat in 1982. He died on November 15, 2006 in Woodland Hills, California.

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Rita Hayworth (Photo by Irving Lippman, 1938) via

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Bette Davis  (Photo by Irving Lippman) via

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Miriam Hopkins (Photo by Irving Lippman, 1933) via

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Tallulah Bankhead (Photo by irving lippman) via

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Fay Wray (Photo by Irving Lippman, 1936) via

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 Claudette Colbert (Photo By Irving Lippman, 1933) via