Hedy Lamarr in Samson and Delilah (1949)

Samson and Delilah is a 1949 American romantic biblical drama film produced and directed by Cecil B. DeMille and released by Paramount Pictures. It depicts the biblical story of Samson, a strongman whose secret lies in his uncut hair, and his love for Delilah, the woman who seduces him, discovers his secret, and then betrays him to the Philistines. It stars Hedy Lamarr and Victor Mature in the title roles, George Sanders as the Saran, Angela Lansbury as Semadar, and Henry Wilcoxon as Ahtur.

At the 23rd Academy Awards on March 29, 1951, Samson and Delilah won for Best Color Art Direction (art directors Hans Dreier and Walter H. Tyler and set decorators Samuel M. Comer and Ray Moyer) and Best Color Costume Design (Edith Head, Dorothy Jeakins, Elois Jenssen, Gile Steele, and Gwen Wakeling)

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Hedy Lamarr in Samson and Delilah, 1949 via

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Hedy Lamarr in Samson and Delilah, 1949 via

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Hedy Lamarr in Samson and Delilah, 1949 via

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Hedy Lamarr in Samson and Delilah, 1949 via

Edith Head’s Costume for Grace Kelly in Rear Window (1954)

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Edith Head’s costume for Grace Kelly in Rear Window directed by Alfred Hitchcock, 1954 via

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Edith Head’s costume for Grace Kelly in Rear Window directed by Alfred Hitchcock, 1954 via

A Collection of Photos Feat. Dresses by Edith Head

Edith Head (1897 – 1981) was an American costume designer who won a record eight Academy Awards for Best Costume Design, starting with The Heiress (1949) and ending with The Sting (1973).

Born and raised in California, Head managed to get a job as a costume sketch artist at Paramount Pictures, without any relevant training. She first acquired notability for Dorothy Lamour’s trademark sarong dress, and then became a household name after the Academy Awards created a new category of Costume Designer in 1948. Head was considered exceptional for her close working relationships with her subjects, with whom she consulted extensively, and these included virtually every top female star in Hollywood.

After 43 years she left Paramount for Universal, possibly because of her successful partnership with Alfred Hitchcock, and also adapted her skills for television.

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Edith Head, 1930s via

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Edith Head’s costume for Anna May Wong in Dangerous to Know directed by Robert Florey, 1938 via

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Grace Kelly wearing her Oscar dress by Edith Head. Photograph by Philippe Halsman via

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Edith Head’s costume for Gloria Swanson in Sunset Blvd directed by Billy Wilder, 1950 via

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Audrey Hepburn (with Edith Head in the background) puts on her tiara and necklace while on the set of Roman Holiday, 1952 via

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Hitchcock and Head on the set of Family Plot, 1976 via