Gloria Swanson in Silent Drama ‘Sadie Thompson’ (1928).

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Silent screen star Gloria Swanson (1897 – 1983) plays a woman of ill repute in the film ‘Sadie Thompson’, 1928. The film was directed by Raoul Walsh for Gloria Swanson Pictures Corporation and United Artists via

Gloria Swanson in Sadie Thompson (1928)

Sadie Thompson is a 1928 American silent drama film that tells the story of a “fallen woman” who comes to Pago Pago on the island of Tutuila to start a new life, but encounters a zealous missionary who wants to force her back to her former life in San Francisco. The film stars Gloria Swanson, Lionel Barrymore, and Raoul Walsh.

A smoking, drinking, jazz listening, young prostitute named Sadie Thompson (Gloria Swanson) arrives at Pago Pago (now part of American Samoa), on her way to a job with a shipping line on another island. At the same time, ‘moralists’ arrive, including Mr. and Mrs. Davidson (Lionel Barrymore and Blanche Friderici).

Portrait of Gloria Swanson in Sadie Thompson directed by Raoul Walsh, 1928 via

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Gloria Swanson and Lionel Barrymore in Sadie Thompson directed by Raoul Walsh, 1928 via

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Portrait of Gloria Swanson and Directo Raoul Walsh on the set of Sadie Thompson, 1928 via

Gloria Swanson and Lionel Barrymore in Sadie Thompson (1928)

Sadie Thompson is a 1928 American silent drama film that tells the story of a “fallen woman” who comes to Pago Pago on the island of Tutuila to start a new life, but encounters a zealous missionary who wants to force her back to her former life in San Francisco. The film stars Gloria Swanson, Lionel Barrymore, and Raoul Walsh, and was one of Swanson’s better known silent films.

Due to the subject matter, the making of the film was extremely controversial. However, it was a financial and critical success for Swanson. The film was based on the short story “Rain” by W. Somerset Maugham and the 1922 play that was based on the book by John Colton and Clemence Randolph, starring Jeanne Eagels.

Gloria Swanson and Lionel Barrymore in Sadie Thompson directed by Raoul Walsh, 1928 via

Gloria Swanson and Lionel Barrymore in Sadie Thompson directed by Raoul Walsh, 1928 via

A Collection of Photos Feat. Hollywood Actresses With Cigarette Holders

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Marlene Dietrich via

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Five Came Back, Lucille ball, 1939 via

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Lupe Velez, 1941 via

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Rita Hayworth, Colombia ictures, 1940s via

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Sunset Boulevard, Gloria Swanson, 1950 via

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Anita Ekberg, with a cigarette holder via

A Collection of Photos Of Famous Women Wearing the 1920s Popular Cloche Hat

 

French milliner Caroline Reboux, is considered the inventor of the cloche hat via

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Gloria Swanson 1921 in a cloche hat via

 

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Josephine Baker wearing a cloche via

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A 1920s model wearing a black cloche hat via

Joan Crawford models a 1920s hat

Hollywood actress Joan Crawford via

Gloria Swanson in Don’t Change Your Husband

Don’t Change Your Husband is a 1919 American silent comedy film directed by Cecil B. DeMille and starring Gloria Swanson. The film was the third of six “marriage films” directed by DeMille and the first DeMille film starring Gloria Swanson.

Based upon a description in a film magazine, Leila Porter (Swanson) has grown tired of her husband James Denby Porter (Elliott Dexter), the glue king, as she is romantic but he is prosaic.

Moreover, he is careless of his personal appearance, gets cigar ash in the carpet, and eats green onions before he tries to kiss her.

She obtains a divorce and then marries James’ friend Schuyler Van Sutphen (Lew Cody), but discovers that Van Sutphen is a real beast.

When she later discovers that her ex-husband has changed as a result of the divorce, still loves her, and would be happy to have her back, Leila divorces once again in order to remarry James.

Don’t Change Your Husband was a watershed film for Gloria. It opened in January and was held over for two weeks in New York, which was unheard of at the time.

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Gloria Swanson in a production still from Don’t Change Your Husband, 1919 via

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Gloria Swanson in Don’t Change Your Husband, 1919 via

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Gloria Swanson & Lew Cody in Don’t Change Your Husband, 1919 via

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Gloria Swanson & Elliott Dexter in Don’t Change Your Husband, 1919 via

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Gloria Swanson in Don’t Change Your Husband, 1919 via

Gloria Swanson Wearing Chanel in Tonight or Never (1931)

Tonight or Never is a 1931 American pre-Code comedy film directed by Mervyn LeRoy, starring Gloria Swanson and featuring Boris Karloff. Nella Vargo (Swanson) is a Hungarian prima donna whose latest performances include singing Tosca in Venice. Although she is praised by the audience, her music teacher Rudig feels that she can not be the greatest opera singer in history until she performs in New York City. When she is criticized for not putting her soul into the song, she gets mad, until she suddenly notices a mysterious man walking on the street. She becomes smitten with the man, until Rudig claims that he is a gigolo whose latest client is Marchesa Bianca San Giovanni, a former diva with a notorious past.

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Gloria Swanson in Tonight or Never directed by Mervyn LeRoy, 1931. Dress by Coco Chanel via

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Gloria Swanson in Tonight or Never directed by Mervyn LeRoy, 1931. Dress by Coco Chanel via

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Gloria Swanson in Tonight or Never directed by Mervyn LeRoy, 1931. Dress by Coco Chanel via

A Collection of Photos Featuring Mack Sennett´s “Bathing Beauties”

According to laphamsquarterly.org Mack Sennett gave Chaplin, Arbuckle, and Mabel Normand their first breaks, and was one of the founding patrons of comedy. But Sennett was also responsible for the concept of the “Bathing Beauty”—and, by extension, filmic eye-candy as we know it today.

The “bathing beauties,” themselves, were a  a group of young starlets who appeared bare-legged in Sennett’s comedies. They were particularly popular and became pin-up girls for the soldiers of the First World War. They included Gloria Swanson, Marie Prevost, Phyllis Haver, Juanita Hansen, Claire Anderson, and Mary Thurman.

The sex appeal of these young actresses raised the ire of some temperance activists, and Sennett received hundreds of letters protesting his exploitation of these women’s bodies. Despite such protests, the bathing beauties remained quite popular.

The Sennett Bathing Beauties would continue to appear through 1928.

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1915 via

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Marvel Rea, 1919 via

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Bathing Beauties (Credit: Collection of Dave and Ali Stevenson) via

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1915 via

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1915 via

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 Carole Lombard and Mack Sennett; far right, with a white hat and dark suit. It was taken during a seaside shoot in 1928, while Lombard was part of Sennett’s troupe via

A Collection of Vintage Photos Feat. the Glamorous Fashion & Style of the 192Os

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Clara Bow

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Gloria Swanson in the Queen Kelly, 1929

 Josephine Baker

Josephine baker´s Eton crop haircut

1920s flapper Louise Brooks

Louise Brooks short bobbed flapper hair

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Marion Morehouse in Chanel. Photo by Edward Steichen, Vogue, 1926

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Norma Shearer giving thanks for her amazing wardrobe collection in A Slave to Fashion, 1925

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Bebe Daniels with a tiger, 1927

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1920s icon Gilda Gray looking very glamorous

Bloomer-esque short pants and a jaunty monocle, what's not to adore? (Image 1927-1928.) #vintage #1920s #fashion

1920s girl with monocle

1920s style