Wonderful Vintage Photos of Marilyn Monroe Performing Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend (1953)

The musical number from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes whose lyrics explain why and how women need to pursue men with money.

Monroe’s rendition of the number and her pink dress are considered iconic, and the performance has inspired homages by Madonna, Geri Halliwell, Kylie Minogue, Nicole Kidman, Anna Nicole Smith, Christina Aguilera and James Franco.

annex-monroe-marilyn-gentlemen-prefer-blondes_12

Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953 via

002-gentlemen-prefer-blondes-theredlist

Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953 via

annex-monroe-marilyn-gentlemen-prefer-blondes_13

Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953 via

annex-monroe-marilyn-gentlemen-prefer-blondes_nrfpt_64

Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953 via

 

annex-monroe-marilyn-gentlemen-prefer-blondes_nrfpt_63

Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953 via

Advertisements

Vintage Cinema Photos of Actresses Playing Nuns

229-audrey-hepburn-theredlist

Portrait of Audrey Hepburn in The Nun’s Story directed by Fred Zinnemann, 1959 via

nunjoan

Joan Collins for the Sea wife, 1957 via

013-ingrid-bergman-theredlist

Portrait of Ingrid Bergman in The Bell’s of St. Mary’s directed by Leo McCarey, 1945. Photo by Ralph Crane via

145-anna-karina-theredlist

Anna Karine in La religieuse directed by Jacques Rivette, 1966 via

012-the-black-narcissus-theredlist

Deborah Kerr in Black Narcissus directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1947 via

002-the-sound-of-music-theredlist

Julie Andrews and Peggy Wood in The Sound of Music directed by Robert Wise, 1965 via

035-debbie-reynolds-theredlist

Debbie Reynolds in The Singing Nun directed by Henry Koster, 1966 via

 

Maria’s Wedding Dress: Julie Andrews in The Sound of Music (1965)

009-the-sound-of-music-theredlist

The Wedding Dress from The Sound of Music  via

maria-maria-von-trapp-julie-andrews-26877895-800-994

The Wedding Dress from The Sound of Music via

ulie-andrews-in-the-sound-of-music

The Wedding Dress from The Sound of Music via

013-julie-andrews-theredlist

The Wedding Dress from The Sound of Music  via

Audrey while making The Unforgiven. Photos by Inge Morath (1959)

The Unforgiven is a 1960 American western film filmed in Durango, Mexico. It was directed by John Huston and has the unusual casting of Audrey Hepburn.

Magnum Photos Agency photographer Inge Morath had met director John Huston while she was living in London, Morath worked on several of his films.

The Unforgiven, uncommonly for its time, spotlights the issue of racism against Native Americans and people believed to have Native American blood in the Old West.

Aside from this the film is most notable for its behind-the-scenes problems. Production was suspended for several months in 1959 after Hepburn broke her back when she fell off a horse while rehearsing a scene. Although she eventually recovered, the accident was blamed for a subsequent miscarriage Hepburn suffered.

While photographing the making of The Unforgiven, Inge Morath accompanied Huston and his friends duck hunting on a mountain lake outside Durango. Photographing the excursion, Morath saw through her telephoto lens that actor Audie Murphy and his companion had capsized their boat 350 feet from shore. She could see that Murphy, stunned, was nearly drowning. A skilled swimmer, Morath stripped to her underwear and hauled the two men ashore by her bra strap while the hunt continued uninterrupted

audrey-morat

Audrey Hepburn during the production of The Unforgiven, Durango, Mexico, 1959. Photograph by Inge Morath.

via

pinterest.com

audrey-durango

Audrey Hepburn during the production of The Unforgiven, Durango, Mexico, 1959. Photograph by Inge Morath.

via

rareaudreyhepburn.com

audrey-mex-durango

Audrey Hepburn during the production of The Unforgiven, Durango, Mexico, 1959. Photograph by Inge Morath.

via

rareaudreyhepburn.com

audrey-mex-durango

Audrey Hepburn during the production of The Unforgiven, Durango, Mexico, 1959. Photograph by Inge Morath.

via

liveauctioneers.com

Ruth Harriet Louise – First Woman Hollywood Photographer

Ruth Harriet Louise (1903 – 1940) ran Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s portrait studio from 1925 to 1930.

When Louise was hired by MGM as chief portrait photographer in the summer of 1925, she was twenty-two years old, and the only woman working as a portrait photographer for the Hollywood studios.

In a career that lasted only five years, Louise photographed all the stars, contract players, and many of the hopefuls who passed through the studio’s front gates, including Greta Garbo, Lon Chaney, John Gilbert, Joan Crawford, Marion Davies, and Norma Shearer. It is estimated that she took more than 100,000 photos during her tenure at MGM.

Today she is considered an equal with George Hurrell Sr. and other renowned glamour photographers of the era.

JoanCrawford-LouiseST

Joan Crawford by Ruth Harriet Louise for Dream of Love (1926)

via

ebay.com

PageRuthHL

Anita Page by Ruth Harriet Louise

via

tumblr.com

Dorothy-Sebastian-photo-by-Ruth-Harriet-Louise-p504-457x600

Dorothy Sebastian by Ruth Harriet Louise

via

visualhistory.ru

Ruth Harriet LouiseGarbo

Greta Garbo by  Ruth Harriet Louise for “The Temptress” (1926)

via

1stdibs.com

ruth_harriet_louise_portrait_of_marceline_day_r1

Marceline Day by Ruth Harriet Louise

via

brettmoffatt.com

Ruth_Harriet_Louise_selfportrait

Ruth Harriet Louise (self-portrait)

via

wiki

Bebe Daniels – Beautiful Silent Era Film Star

Bebe Daniels (1901 – 1971) was an American actress, singer, dancer, writer and producer. She began her career in Hollywood during the silent movie era as a child actress, became a star in musicals such as 42nd Street, and later gained further fame on radio and television in Britain. In a long career, Bebe Daniels made over 230 films.

By the age of seven Daniels had her first starring role in film as the young heroine in A Common Enemy. At the age of nine she starred as Dorothy Gale in the 1910 short film The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. At the age of fourteen she starred opposite film comedian Harold Lloyd in a series of Lonesome Luke two-reel comedies starting with the 1915 film Giving Them Fits. The two eventually developed a publicized romantic relationship and were known in Hollywood as “The Boy” and “The Girl.

Daniels, Bebe (Love Comes Along)

Bebe Daniels in Love Comes Along

via

doctormacro.com

bebedaniels2

Bebe Daniels

via

tumblr.com

Bebe_Daniels

Bebe Daniels in What a Night!

via

doctormacro.com

bebeDanilesbride

Bebe Daniels Wedding Dress 1923

via

vintag.es

Bebe_Daniels1

Bebe Daniels

via

tumblr.com

Bille Dove – The American Beauty

Billie Dove (1903-1997) was in her heyday known for her voluptuous femininity on the silent screen, rivaled that of Mary Pickford, Marion Davies and Clara Bow in popularity. She retired after only a few years into the talking picture era, however, and is not as well-remembered in today’s film circles as the aforementioned.

She was born Bertha Bohny to Swiss immigrant parents. As a teen, she worked as a model to help support her family and was hired as a teenager by Florenz “Flo” Ziegfeld to appear in his Ziegfeld Follies Revue.

However, a burgeoning affair between Dove and Ziegfeld prompted Ziegfeld’s wife Billie Burke to arrange work out West for the young starlet in Hollywood films. She soon became one of the most popular actresses of the 1920s, appearing in Douglas Fairbanks’ smash hit Technicolor film The Black Pirate (1926), as Rodeo West in The Painted Angel (1929), and was dubbed The American Beauty (1927), the title of one of her films.

She married the director of her seventh film, Irvin Willat, in 1923. The two divorced in 1929. Dove had a huge legion of male fans, one of her most persistent being Howard Hughes. She shared a three-year romance with Hughes and was engaged to marry him, but she ended the relationship without ever giving cause. Hughes cast her as a comedian in his film Cock of the Air (1932). She also appeared in his movie The Age for Love (1931).

Following her last film, Blondie of the Follies (1932), Dove retired from the screen to be with her family, although she was at the time still popular. She married oil executive Robert Kenaston in 1933.

Ziegfeld Model - Non-Risque - by Alfred Cheney Johnston

Billie Dove as a Ziegfield Follies Girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston

via

chicvintagebrides.com

Ziegfeld Model - Risque - 1920s - by Alfred Cheney Johnston

Billie Dove as a Ziegfield Follies Girl by Alfred Cheney Johnston

via

doctormacro.com

Annex - Dove, Billie_08

Billie Dove

via

doctormacro.com

Billie-Dove-Bride

Billie Dove as a Bride

via

chicvintagebrides.com

Annex - Dove, Billie_06

Billie Dove

via

doctormacro.com

images515

Billie Dove

via

thefedoralounge.com

Annex - Dove, Billie (Blondie of the Follies)_01

Billæie Dove in Blondie of the Follies, her last film (1932)

via

doctormacro.com

Billie Dove (Reprise)