Fab Vintage photos of The Biba London Fashion Store

Iconic clothes store Biba was founded by Polish born fashion designer Barbara Hulanicki OBE (b. 1936). She opened her Biba shop in the Kensington district of London in 1864 with the help of her late husband, Stephen Fitz-Simon.

The shop soon became known for its stylishly decadent atmosphere and lavish decor inspired by Art Nouveau and Art Deco. It became a hangout for artists, film stars and rock musicians, including Mick Jagger and The Rolling Stones, David Bowie and Marianne Faithfull.

In the shop, a young clientele bought affordable mini-skirts, floppy felt hats, feather boas, velvet trouser suits and unisex T-shirts dyed in rich, muted colors. Incidentally, Anna Wintour started in fashion as a Biba employee.

After the shop’s 1975 demise, Hulanicki continued to work in the fashion industry, designing for labels such as Fiorucci and Cacharel and, from 1980 to 1992, designed a line of children’s wear, Minirock, licensed to the Japanese market.

biba

The London Biba store via

980x1306-biba-queuemain-jpg-e62df9a4

 Queue for the Biba store via

980x1306-bibashopmain-jpg-aaab7d77

Inside the Biba store via

bibadog1

The food department was sectioned into separate units that each contained one type of item. There was a section modelled after Hulanicki’s great dane Othello in which you’d find only dog food via

Biba (1)

Shopping at Biba, 1960s via

bibagirl

Some Biba sales-girls via

Biba Founder

Barbara Hulanicki, designer and founder of Biba, in her first boutique in Abingdon Road, Kensington, London, mid 1960s. (Photo by Charles Edridge/Getty Images) via

 

 

Advertisements

Amazing French Fashion Photography by Georges Dambier

Georges Dambier was born in 1925 and was one of the first fashion photographers to take models out of the studio and into the streets. While he was still building and perfecting his craft, Dambier was hired by Helene Lazareff, director of ELLE, the fashion magazine, who encouraged him and gave him his first assignment as a fashion photographer.

During his career Dambier photographed amongst others: Rita Hayworth, Gene Tierney, Errol Flynn, Jeanne Moreau, Jean Cocteau, ou Colette, mais aussi Bettina, Capucine and Suzy Parker.

Georges Dambier did not conform to the standard technique of taking fashion pictures, with models standing emotionless and seemingly indifferent to the camera. Instead, he showed models smiling, laughing and often in action. His models were surrounded by local people in a market place in Marrakech, or in a village in Corsica, or – and above all – in his beloved Paris. 

Capucine for ELLE, Boulevard de la Madeleine, Paris,1952 by Georges Dambier

via

 artnet

Suzy Parker by Georges Dambier

via

 livejournal

Suzy Parker Shop Lanvin, for Elle 1952 by Georges Dambier

via

1stdibs

1957 via lifeonphoto

Sophie Litvak and little dog, for Elle 1952 via 1stdibs

London – Francis William Lauderdale Adams (1862 – 1893)

CRUEL City, London, London,
Where, duped slaves of devils’ creeds,
Men and women desperate, undone,
Dream such dreams, and do such deeds:
London, London, cruel city,
By day serpent, by night vampire —
God, in thy great pity, pity,
Give us light — though it be fire!

Anna Pavlova – The Finest Classical Ballet Dancer

Anna Pavlova  (1881 – 1931) was a Russian Empire ballerina of the late 19th and the early 20th centuries. She is widely regarded as one of the finest classical ballet dancers in history and was most noted as a principal artist of the Imperial Russian Ballet and the Ballets Russes of Sergei Diaghilev.

Young Pavlova’s years of training were difficult. Classical ballet did not come easily to her. Her severely arched feet, thin ankles, and long limbs clashed with the small and compact body in favour for the ballerina at the time. Her fellow students taunted her with such nicknames as The broom and The little savage. Undeterred, Pavlova trained to improve her technique and  took extra lessons from the noted teachers of the day. Many of her famous qoutes are about hard work paying of e.g.:

Success depends in a very large measure upon individual initiative and exertion, and cannot be achieved except by a dint of hard work

Pavlova is perhaps most renowned for creating the role of The Dying Swan, a solo choreographed for her by Michel Fokine. The ballet, created in 1905, is danced to Le cygne from The Carnival of the Animals by Camille Saint-Saëns.

While touring in The Hague, Pavlova was told that she had pneumonia and required an operation. She was also told that she would never be able to dance again if she went ahead with it. She refused to have the surgery, saying “If I can’t dance then I’d rather be dead.” She died of pleurisy, three weeks short of her 50th birthday.

Anna Pavlova, costumed as The dying swan (5)

Anna Pavlova

10192767_1

Anna Pavlova

8408373430_5ee60f8f37_b

Anna Pavlova

8408374530_efe6e67d8c_b

Anna Pavlova

Anna_Pavlova

Anna Pavlova

anna in her wedding dress

Anna Pavlova

The Dying Swan

The short ballet follows the last moments in the life of a swan, and was first presented in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1905. Pavlova performed the dance about 4,000 times. The ballet has since influenced modern interpretations of Odette in Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake and has inspired non-traditional interpretations and various adaptations.

Elsbeth Juda – Pioneering fashion photographs

Elsbeth Juda, known professionally as Jay (born 2 May 1911), is a British photographer most notable for her pioneering fashion photographs and work as Associate Editor and photographer for The Ambassador magazine between 1940-1965.

Juda was born in Darmstadt, Germany on 2 May 1911. At 18, she refused to go to Oxford as her father wished and went to Paris where she found work as secretary to a banker. In 1931, Elsbeth married her childhood love, Hans Juda, and they went to live in Berlin where he was a financial editor at the Berliner Tageblatt. In 1933, they fled Nazi Germany with nothing but a violin and moved to a one-room flat in London, a city she had been sent to frequently, if not happily, as a girl.

Juda studied photography under Lucia Moholy (wife of László Moholy-Nagy) formerly of the Bauhaus and started her long career in a commercial studio as “dark room boy”. In 1940, Hans became founding publisher and editor of The Ambassador, The British Export Magazine. Juda would later join the magazine as associate editor and fashion photographer as, unlike Hans, she spoke fluent English.

729

Elsbeth Juda

727

Elsbeth Juda

EJ-02

Elsbeth Juda

 EJ-09

Elsbeth Juda