A Collection of Photos Of Famous Women Wearing the 1920s Popular Cloche Hat

 

French milliner Caroline Reboux, is considered the inventor of the cloche hat via

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Gloria Swanson 1921 in a cloche hat via

 

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Josephine Baker wearing a cloche via

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A 1920s model wearing a black cloche hat via

Joan Crawford models a 1920s hat

Hollywood actress Joan Crawford via

Vintage Photos of Elegant Millinery by Madame Agnès

Madame Agnes (late 1800s-1949) was France’s most popular milliner. She designed hats that were popular from the late 1920s until the 1940s. She was famous for cutting the brims of her hats while they were worn by her customers. Her shop was located on the Rue Saint-Honoré.

She associated with people in the art circles of Paris and styled hats that were both abstract and unique. She preferred wearing only black fashions, fx. in 1929 she wore black satin frocks designed by Vionnet. Her clothes were embellished with bright jewelry like red coral, jade or lapis lazuli.

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Madame Agnes in her shop in Paris, 1935.

Madame Agnes in her shop in Paris, 1935

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Edward Steichen, Dorothy Smart, hat by Madame Agnès, 1926

Madame d’Ora- Madame Jean Lassalle portant des bijoux Jean Fouquet et un chapeau de Madame Agnès, mars 1929. http://fantomas-en-cavale.tumblr.com

Madame Jean Lassalle hat by Madame Agnès, Madame d’Ora, 1929

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Portrait of the milliner Agnès by Madame d’Ora, Paris, 1928-1931

Model in hat of bird of paradise feathers by Madame Agnès (milliner), spangled jacket by Maggy Rouff, photo by George Hoyningen-Huene, Harper’s Bazaar, 1935

Model in hat of bird of paradise feathers by Madame Agnès, spangled jacket by Maggy Rouff, photo by George Hoyningen-Huene, Harper’s Bazaar, 1935

Superb Vintage Photos of Beautiful Edwardian Era Hairstyles

Edwardian hairstyles were largely dictated by the millinery trade. The hairstyles had a soft, fluffy and loose fluidity about them. Hair was dressed off the face, with the exception of a fringe, and hairstyles rarely had a parting.

The defining Edwardian hairstyle for women was the pompadour. After the Pompadour´s initial popularity among fashionable women in the 18th century, it was revived as part of the Gibson Girl look in the 1890s and continued to be in vogue until World War I.

Other hairstyles were fx. the Low Pompadour (for everyday), Hat Pin Hairstyles (for the late Edwardian Cartwheel hat), the Gibson Tuck, the Side-Swirl (the style allowed women to easier wear the picture hats), the bouffant and the chignon. Usually the full Pompadour hairstyle was kept for special occasions. In the early part of the Edwardian era it was accompanied by the “picture” hat; hats that were worn high on the head and heavily decorated with fabric, feathers or imitation flowers or fruit.

The  Pompadour hairstyle could be dressed in all manner of styles, but the basic concept is hair swept upwards from the face and worn high over the forehead, and sometimes upswept around the sides and back as well. The style could feature soft coils and fuzzy curled fringes. It could be decorated with a bun, chignon or knot, depending on what was in vogue at the time and the occasion. Chignons tended to sit low on the nape, or at the back of the head. A bun could also be situated on the crown. A knot is hair that is twisted to form a rope, and then coiled to form a shape. The different shapes had names, for example the Apollo Kno, the Psyche Knot and the Grecian Knot. A topknot sits high on the head.

Evelyn Nesbit, who posed for illustrator Charles Dana Gibson, and became known as the first “Gibson Girl.” Gibson’s drawings of women represented the feminin ideal of the time via

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The Soft Pompadour and Psyche Knot. From Girls Own Paper and Woman’s magazine, 1911 via

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Gibson Girls with Pompadour hair via

After the Victorian era hair got bigger and bigger via

Actress Gabrielle Ray´s hairstyle fits her large decorated hat, 1906 via

Edwardian lady with big frizzy hair via

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Miss Ethel Oliver with big Edwardian hair via

Nancy Astor, 1908. beautiful portrait.

Nancy Astor with a knot, 1908 via

Beautiful Vintage Millinery by Lilly Daché (1898 – 1989)

Lilly Daché (1898 – 1989) was a French milliner and fashion designer. During her career she was the most famous milliner in the United States.

In her native France, Lilly Daché was considered (by her mother, no less) a homely child. Lilly’s thin, strong face with its green cat’s eyes and framing of straight red hair were deemed ugly. Not too surprisingly, little Lilly turned to adornment to amend her failings: braiding cherries into her hair & making hats from grape leaves. Her passion creating beauty took her to Paris to study hatmaking (after all, as Lilly says, if your hat is correct, it can compensate for a world of faults).

Lilly Daché designed for Hollywood films and had many clients who were movie-stars. International star Maria Montez loved her Lillys so much, she created a scene at Chicago’s Union Station when she discovered 2 of her 8 Daché hatboxes were missing. Never mind that she was being reunited with her medal-strewn soldier-husband whom she hadn’t seen for a year–Maria had bigger fish to fry. “I want my Daché hats!” she stormed after briefly smiling for the photographers.

Her designs and hats are valued highly by collectors of vintage clothes. Both the designer Halston and the hair stylist Kenneth worked for her before going into business for themselves.

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Lily Dache checking out her hat design via

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Hat by Lilly Daché via

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Barbara Mullen wearing a headpiece by Lilly Daché, New York, 1951. Photo by Richard Avedon via

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Hat by Lilly Daché via

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Carmen Miranda wearing hat/turban by Lilly Daché via

Elegant Vintage Fashion Photos: 1950s Veiled Hats

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Irving Penn, Model Jean Patchett in black and white hat with veil, scarf and top, Vogue, 1950 via

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Jacques Fath, Hat with Veil, photographed by Willy Maywald, 1951

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Lillian Marcuson in Lily Dache hat, photo by Milton Greene, 1951 via

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Mary Jane Russell photo by Larry Gordon, 1952 via

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Ivy Nicholson © Room wearing Givenchy’s stiff-veiled circlet, Photo Nat Farbman, 1952 via

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Bettina Graziani Photo by Georges Dambier via

Vintage French Millinery by Jean Barthet

Jean Barthet (1920–2000) was a French milliner who first rose to prominence in the 1950s as hat maker to Hollywood and French film stars, also designing hats for films such as The Young Girls of Rochefort.

He helped to define fashionable hat styles – including the bucket hat, pillbox hat and fedora – that predominated throughout the 1960s and collaborated with major couture houses.

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Jean Barthet, Hat, photographed by Henry Clarke, 1955 via

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Denise Sarrault in Jean Barthet Beret, photographed by Georges Saad, 1957 via

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Capucine in Jean Barthet, Hat, photographed by Willy Maywald, 1950s via

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Brigitte Bardot in Jean Barthet Hat, 1961 via