Iconic 1960s Model Jean Shrimpton in New York by David Bailey (1962)

Jean Shrimpton’s (1942) was a fashion model and icon of Swinging London. Her  career rose to prominence through her work with photographer David Bailey.

Of Jean Shrimpton, Bailey said:

She was magic and the camera loved her too. In a way she was the cheapest model in the world – you only needed to shoot half a roll of film and then you had it. She had the knack of having her hand in the right place, she knew where the light was, she was just a natural.

Shrimpton’s first photo session with Bailey was in 1960 (either for Condé Nast’s Brides on 7 December 1960 or for British Vogue). She started to become known in the modelling world around the time she was working with Bailey.

Shrimpton has stated she owed Bailey her career, and he is often credited for discovering her and being influential in her career.

In turn, she was Bailey’s muse, and his photographs of her helped him rise to prominence in his early career.

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962 via

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962 via

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962 via

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962 via

Photos of New York City by Alfred Stieglitz

Alfred Stieglitz (1864 – 1946) was an American photographer and modern art promoter who was instrumental over his fifty-year career in making photography an accepted art form.

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Alfred Stieglitz, Two Towers, New York City, 1911 via

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Alfred Stieglitz, Old and New New York, 1910 via

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Alfred Stieglitz City of ambition, 1910 via

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Alfred Stieglitz, The Flat-Iron, 1903 via

Vintage Photos of Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

Breakfast at Tiffany’s is a 1961 American romantic comedy film starring Audrey Hepburn as the naïve, eccentric café society girl Holly Golightly. It is loosely based on the novella of the same name by Truman Capote.

One early morning, a yellow taxi pulls up at Tiffany & Co. on Fifth Avenue in New York City, from which elegantly dressed Holly Golightly emerges. Standing outside the shop looking into the windows, she nibbles on pastry and drinks coffee she brought with her, then strolls home to go to bed…

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Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961 via

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Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961 via

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Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961 via

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Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961 via

Grace Kelly in New York before she embarked for Monaco (1956)

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Grace Kelly. Date: March 1956. Photographer: Lisa Larsen via

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Grace Kelly. Date: March 1956. Photographer: Lisa Larsen via

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Grace Kelly. Date: March 1956. Photographer: Lisa Larsen via

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Grace Kelly. Date: March 1956. Photographer: Lisa Larsen via

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Grace Kelly. Date: March 1956. Photographer: Lisa Larsen via

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Grace Kelly. Date: March 1956. Photographer: Lisa Larsen via

Marlene Dietrich in New York by Cecil Beaton (1937)

Cecil Beaton came to New York in 1928. Through personal connections he gained access to some of Hollywood’s biggest stars–including Marlene Dietrich (source).

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Portrait of Marlene Dietrich in New York by Cecil Beaton, 1937 via

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Portrait of Marlene Dietrich in New York by Cecil Beaton, 1937 via

Portraits by Photographer Inge Morath

Ingeborg Hermine “Inge” Morath (1923 – 2002) was an Austrian-born photographer. In 1953, she joined the Magnum Photos Agency, founded by top photographers in Paris, and became a full photographer with them in 1955. Along with Eve Arnold, she was among the first women members.  Magnum remains to this day a predominantly male organization.

Morath’s work was motivated by a fundamental humanism, shaped as much by her experience of war as by its lingering shadow over post-war Europe. In Morath’s mature work, she documents the endurance of the human spirit under situations of extreme duress, as well as its manifestations of ecstasy and joy.

In 1955, she published her first collection of photographs, a total of 30 monographs during her lifetime. Morath was also the third and last wife of playwright Arthur Miller; their daughter is screenwriter/director Rebecca Miller.

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Self-Portrait by Inge Morath, Jerusalem, 1958 via

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Inge Morath, Portrait of Anais Nin, 1959 © Inge Morath © The Inge Morath Foundation via

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Inge Morath, Gloria Vanderbilt New York, 1956 ©  Fotosammlung WestLicht, Wien via

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Jayne Mansfield in bed in Beverly Hills, Inge Morath 1959 via

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Audrey Hepburn during the production of The Unforgiven, Durango, Mexico by Inge Morath 1959 via

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Marilyn Monroe on the set of the Misfits by Inge Morath, 1960s via