Vintage Photos of Bloomsbury Clique Society Hostess Lady Ottoline Morrell

Lady Ottoline Violet Anne Morrell (1873 – 1938) was an English aristocrat and society hostess. She was part of the literary Bloomsbury clique, along with Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West, Lytton Strachey, Clive and Vanessa Bell, E.M. Forster and more.

Perhaps Lady Ottoline’s most interesting literary legacy is the wealth of representations of her that appear in 20th-century literature. She was the inspiration for Mrs Bidlake in Aldous Huxley’s Point Counter Point, for Hermione Roddice in D. H. Lawrence’s Women in Love, for Lady Caroline Bury in Graham Greene’s It’s a Battlefield, and for Lady Sybilline Quarrell in Alan Bennett’s Forty Years On. The Coming Back (1933), another novel which portrays her, was written by Constance Malleson, one of Ottoline’s many rivals for the affection of Bertrand Russell. Some critics consider her the inspiration for Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley. Huxley’s roman à clef, Crome Yellow depicts the life at a thinly-veiled Garsington, one of her estates.

Non-literary portraits are also part of this interesting legacy, for example, as seen in the artistic photographs of her by Cecil Beaton. There are portraits by Henry Lamb, Duncan Grant, Augustus John, and others. Carolyn Heilbrun edited Lady Ottoline’s Album (1976), a collection of snapshots and portraits of Morrell and of her famous contemporaries, mostly taken by Morrell herself.

NPG x144140; Lady Ottoline Morrell by George Charles Beresford

Portrait of Lady Ottoline Morrell by George Charles Beresford, 4 June 1903 via

cavendish

Lady Ottoline Morrell by Cavendish Morton platinum print, 1905 via

Lady_Ottoline_Morrell_by_Adolf_de_Meyer_circa_1912

Portrait of Lady Ottoline Morrell by Adolf de Meyer, c. 1912 via

NPG P1008; Lady Ottoline Morrell by Baron Adolph de Meyer

Lady Ottoline Morrell by Baron Adolph de Meyer
platinum print, 1912 via

NPG x14149; Lady Ottoline Morrell by Cecil Beaton

Lady Ottoline Morrell, by Cecil Beaton, 1927 © Cecil Beaton Studio Archive, Sotheby’s London via

NPG Ax143221; Lady Ottoline Morrell possibly by Lady Ottoline Morrell

Lady Ottoline Morrell, 1929 via

NPG Ax142145; Lady Ottoline Morrell ('Mummy in her bedroom at Amerongen') by Lady Ottoline Morrell

Lady Ottoline Morrell in her bedroom at Amerongen, 1925 via

A Collection Vintage Photos Feat. Amazing Ballerina Ida Rubinstein

Ida Rubinstein (1883-1960) was a famous Russian ballerina, actress, patron and Belle Époque figure.

As an idol of the fin de siècle, she was renowned for her beauty, mimetic powers and enormous wealth. She was a significant patron and she tended to commission works that suited her abilities, works that mixed dance with drama and stagecraft.

She was born in Kharkiv (Ukraine) and was orphaned at an early age. The family was wealthy, cultured and Russified, a merchant-banking clan that had moved up the social ranks; her father’s title, Hereditary Honorary Citizen, conferred gentry status.

She made her debut in 1908 in a private performance of Oscar Wilde’s Salomé. The part brought her to the attention of Serge Diaghilev (1872–1929), who included her in the earliest Paris seasons of his celebrated Ballets Russes.

She was not in the top tier of ballerinas; she began her training too late for that to have been a possibility. Because of her limited dance training, she was cast in “mime” roles such as Cleopatra (1909) and Ta-Hor in Schéhérazade (1910), which capitalized on her dark, exotic looks and stunning stage presence. Both ballets were choreographed by Fokine, and designed by Léon Bakst. Her partner in Scherazade was the great Nijinsky. Rubinstein left the Ballets Russes in 1911.

By the 1920s she had become a grande dame of the French theatre. In 1928 Rubinstein formed her own dance company, using her inherited wealth, and commissioned several lavish productions. Her last performance was in the play Jeanne d’Arc au bûcher in Paris, 1939.

In 1940 she left France during the German invasion, and made her way to England via Algeria and Morocco. She later returned to France, living finally at Les Olivades at Vence, where she lived in strict seclusion, reading the Bible and occasionally visiting the Abbey of Cîteaux. She died in 1960 and was buried nearby.

Ida_Rubinstein_1912

Ida Rubinstein, 1912 via

tumblr_nuvgpdSAzA1tphleno1_500

Ida Rubinstein via

tumblr_mzm8x2DjxV1tphleno1_1280

Ida Rubinstein, Antoine and Cleopatre, 1920 via

Ida_Rubinstein_1910

Ida Rubinstein in the Ballets Russes production of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s ‘Scheharazade’, 1910 via

Ida_Rubinstein_1922b

Ida Rubinstein, 1922 via

Photographies_par_Otto_Wegener_-_Hôtel_de_vente_Drouot_-_2018_-_17 (1)

Ida Rubinstein with a baby leopard by Otto Wegener, via

1024px-Photographies_par_Otto_Wegener_-_Hôtel_de_vente_Drouot_-_2018_-_18

Ida Rubinstein by Otto Wegener, via

1024px-Photographies_par_Otto_Wegener_-_Hôtel_de_vente_Drouot_-_2018_-_19

Ida Rubinstein by Otto Wegener, via

tumblr_njyljeaWgQ1s64qv3o1_1280

Ida Rubinstein, 1920s via