Actresses Making Faces for Photographer Willy Rizzo (1960s)

Willy Rizzo (1928 – 2013) was an Italian photographer and designer.

Attracted by the allure of the United States and the then still mythical world of the Californian celebrity, Rizzo travelled to New York to work with the Black Star Agency in the developing America of the post-war years. During this time, he succeeded in capturing and reporting on Hollywood legends, such as Gregory Peck and Gary Cooper

In late 1948, Willy began an illustrious twenty-year career with Paris Match that would have him photograph some of the greatest names of the golden age of photojournalism. Married later to actress Elsa Martinelli, Rizzo enjoyed unparalleled access to the stars.

Marlene Dietrich, Brigitte Bardot, Sophia Loren, Marilyn Monroe, Vivien Leigh, Audrey Hepburn, Jane Fonda, Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, Salvador Dalí and Pablo Picasso all found themselves in front of Rizzo’s lens.

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Willy Rizzo, Catherine Deneuve, 1966 via


Willy Rizzo, Jane Fonda, 1960s via

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Willy Rizzo, Marie Laforet, 1966 via

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Willy Rizzo, Anna Karina, 1966 via

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Willy Rizzo, Elsa Martinelli, 1966 via

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Willy Rizzo, Sophia Loren, 1966 via


Three portraits of Princess Victoria, Duchess of Kent and Strathearn (1820s-1830s)

Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (17 August 1786 – 16 March 1861), later Duchess of Kent and Strathearn, was a German princess and the mother of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom.

In 1818 she married Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn (1767–1820 ). The couple were married on 29 May at Amorbach and on 11 July at Kew, a joint ceremony at which Edward’s brother, the Duke of Clarence, later King William IV, married Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen.

Shortly after the marriages, the Kents moved to Germany, where the cost of living would be cheaper.

Soon after, Victoria became pregnant, and the Duke and Duchess, determined to have their child born in England, raced back, arriving at Dover on 23 April 1819, and moved into Kensington Palace, where she soon gave birth to a daughter, Princess Alexandrina Victoria of Kent.


Princess Victoria, Duchess of Kent and Strathearn by Richard James Lane, published by Thomas Boys, after Alfred Edward Chalon lithograph, published 1838 © National Portrait Gallery, London via


Princess Victoria, Duchess of Kent and Strathearn by Thomas Woolnoth, after George Dawe stipple engraving, published 1820 © National Portrait Gallery, London via


Princess Victoria, Duchess of Kent and Strathearn by James Bromley, published by Paul and Dominic Colnaghi & Co, after Sir George Hayter mezzotint, published 1835 © National Portrait Gallery, London via

Three Portraits of Queen Adelaide (Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen) (1830s)

Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen (1792 – 1849) was the queen consort of the United Kingdom and of Hanover as spouse of William IV of the United Kingdom. William IV was King of the United Kingdom and King of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. The third son of George III, William succeeded his elder brother George IV, as the last king and penultimate monarch of Britain’s House of Hanover.

Adelaide was beloved by the British people for her piety, modesty, charity, and her tragic childbirth history. A large portion of her household income was given to charitable causes. She also treated the young Princess Victoria of Kent (William’s heir presumptive and later Queen Victoria) with kindness, despite her own inability to produce an heir and the open hostility between William and Victoria’s mother, the Dowager Duchess of Kent.

She died during the reign of her niece on 2 December 1849 of natural causes at Bentley Priory in Middlesex and was buried at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor.

Adelaide, the capital city of South Australia, is named after her


Queen Adelaide (Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen) by John Cochran, after Fanny Corbaux stipple engraving, 1820s-1830s. © National Portrait Gallery, London via


Queen Adelaide (Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen) by Thomas Goff Lupton, after Sir William Beechey, mezzotint, published 1834 © National Portrait Gallery, London via


Queen Adelaide (Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen) by Samuel William Reynolds, published by Martin Colnaghi, after Sir William Beechey, mezzotint, published September 1831 © National Portrait Gallery, London via


Impressive Pioneer Photography by Hill & Adamson (1843 – 1848)

In 1843 artist David Octavius Hill joined engineer Robert Adamson in partnership at Rock House on Calton Hill, Edinburgh, Scotland.

During their brief four year partnership, between 1843-1848, Hill & Adamson produced the first substantial body of self-consciously artistic work using the newly invented medium of photography.


David Octavius Hill, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848), 1843 via


Miss Matilda Rigby, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848) via


The bird-cage, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848)  via


A Discussion,  Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848), via


The Letter, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848) via


Mr Laing or Laine, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848) via


Piper and Drummer of the 92nd Gordon Highlanders, Edinburgh Castle, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848) via


The Scott Monument,  Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848), about 1845 via

Whistler´s Brilliant Portraits

James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834 – 1903) was an American artist, active during the American Gilded Age and based primarily in the United Kingdom. He was averse to sentimentality and moral allusion in painting, and was a leading proponent of the credo “art for art’s sake”. His famous signature for his paintings was in the shape of a stylized butterfly possessing a long stinger for a tail. The symbol was apt, for it combined both aspects of his personality—his art was characterized by a subtle delicacy, while his public persona was combative.


Jo by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1861 via


Weary by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1863 via


Reading by Lamplight by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1858 via


Annie Haden by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1860 via

Count Burckhardt published 1862 by James Abbott McNeill Whistler 1834-1903

Count Burckhardt by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1862 via


Marvelous Portraits by Edward Weston

Edward Henry Weston (1886 – 1958) was a 20th-century American photographer. He has been called:

“one of the most innovative and influential American photographers…” and “one of the masters of 20th century photography.”

Over the course of his 40-year career Weston photographed an increasingly expansive set of subjects, including landscapes, still lifes, nudes, portraits, genre scenes and even whimsical parodies. It is said that he developed a:

“quintessentially American, and specially Californian, approach to modern photography”

because of his focus on the people and places of the American West. In 1937 Weston was the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship, and over the next two years he produced nearly 1,400 negatives using his 8 × 10 view camera. Some of his most famous photographs were taken of the trees and rocks at Point Lobos, California, near where he lived for many years.

Weston was born in Chicago and moved to California when he was 21. He knew he wanted to be a photographer from an early age, and initially his work was typical of the soft focus pictorialism that was popular at the time. Within a few years, however, he abandoned that style and went on to be one of the foremost champions of highly detailed photographic images.

In 1947 he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and he stopped photographing soon thereafter. He spent the remaining ten years of his life overseeing the printing of more than 1,000 of his most famous images.


Edward Weston, Portrait of Ruth St. Denis, 1916 via


Edward Weston, Unidentified Woman, 1920 via


Tina Modotti, Glendale. Photograph by Edward Weston, 1921 via


Edward Weston. Frida Kahlo, 1930 via


Xenia Kashevaroff photographed by Edward Weston in 1931. This portrait is now in the collection of New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art via

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Edward Weston, Charis Wilson, 1941 The Lane Collection
Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston via