Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip Wedding Photos (1947)

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Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip wedding photos, November 20, 1947 via

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Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip wedding photos, November 20, 1947 via

Princess Margaret & Anthony Armstrong-Jones Wedding Day (1960)

Elizabeth’s sister, Princess Margaret, married photographer Anthony Armstrong-Jones on May 6th 1960. Thousands lined the streets to witness the Queen’s younger sister get married. It was the first ever televised wedding, and 20 million viewers tuned in.

Princess Margaret made the journey from Clarence House to Westminster Abbey in the Glass Coach with the Duke of Edinburgh.

She dressed in white silk and sported a diamond tiara. Among the 2,000 guests in the church were the King and Queen of Sweden, and the traditional Church of England service was led by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

After the ceremony, the pair travelled to Buckingham Palace where they waved to a delighted crowd.

The newlyweds boarded the Royal Yacht Britannia on the Thames and set off for a honeymoon in the Caribbean

Anthony Armstrong-Jones (now the Earl of Snowdon) and Princess Margaret had two children, Viscount Linley and Lady Sarah Armstrong-Jones. Over time, Lord Snowdon got tired of official engagements, saying “I’m not royal; I’m just married to one.”

The couple officially separated in March 1976, and divorced two years later (source).

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Princess Margaret and Antony Armstrong-Jones, May 6, 1960 via

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Princess Margaret and Antony Armstrong-Jones, May 6, 1960 via

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Princess Margaret, May 6, 1960 via

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Princess Margaret and Antony Armstrong-Jones, May 6, 1960 via

The Royal Bridal Gown of Queen Elizabeth (nee Bowes Lyon), 1923

Prince Albert, Duke of York, and Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon were married on 26 April 1923 in Westminster Abbey. Elizabeth’s wedding dress was made from deep ivory chiffon moire, embroidered with pearls and a silver thread. It was intended to match the traditional Flanders lace provided for the train by Queen Mary. Elizabeth’s dress, which was in the fashion of the early 1920s, was designed by Madame Handley-Seymour, dressmaker to Queen Mary.

A strip of Brussels lace, inserted in the dress, was a Strathmore family heirloom. A female ancestor of the bride wore it to a grand ball for “Bonnie Prince Charlie”, Charles Edward Stuart.

The silver leaf girdle had a trail of spring green tulle, trailing to the ground; silver and rose thistle fastened it. According to an era news article:

“In the trimming the bride has defied all old superstitions about the unluckiness of green.”

Unlike more recent dresses, details of this one were publicly revealed in advance of the wedding day. However, the dress was worked on until the last possible opportunity: the day before the wedding, Elizabeth divided her time between the wedding rehearsal and her dressmakers.

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Queen Elizabeth (nee Bowes Lyon) wearing her long bridal veil of old point de Flanderes lace (1923) via

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Queen Elizabeth (nee Bowes Lyon) in her wedding dress (1923) via

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Queen Elizabeth (nee Bowes Lyon) & Prince Albert wearing RAF full dress in the rank of group captain, his senior service rank at the time of his marriage (1923) via

Royal Bride Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon Leaving For Westminster Abbey (1923)

The wedding of Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (later Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother) and Prince Albert, Duke of York (later King George VI), took place on 26 April 1923 at Westminster Abbey.

Lady Elizabeth was attended by eight bridesmaids. Her wedding dress was made from deep ivory chiffon moire, embroidered with pearls and a silver thread.

In an unexpected and unprecedented gesture, Elizabeth laid her bouquet at the Tomb of The Unknown Warrior on her way into the Abbey, in memory of her brother Fergus. Ever since, the bouquets of subsequent royal brides have traditionally been laid at the tomb, though after the wedding ceremony rather than before.

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Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923 via

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Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923  via

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Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923 via

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Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923 via

Wedding of Duke of York and Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon at Westminster Abbey London.