Wedding of Pola Negri and Prince Serge Mdivani (1927)

Pola Negri (1897 – 1987) was a Polish stage and film actress who achieved worldwide fame during the silent and golden eras of Hollywood and European film for her tragedienne and femme fatale roles. She was reportedly Valentino’s lover until his death in 1926 – at the time of his death and for the remainder of her life, Negri would claim Valentino was the love of her life.

Negri and Princw Serge Mdivani were married on 14 May 1927 (less than nine months after Valentino’s death); they were married in the little hamlet of Seraincourt in. When she lost her fortune in the Stock Market Crash of 1929, he abandoned her and took up with opera singer Mary McCormic, who divorced him in a highly publicized trial.

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Pola and Serge in their wedding day 4 May 1927 via

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Photo Shows Pola and Serge, with Prince Gregory Mdivani (center), father of the Groom, and Mr. Clifford B. Harmon, the best Man, at the right, in back of the Groom, shortly after the ceremony was performed via

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Pola and Serge in their wedding day 4 May 1927 via

A Collection of Vintage Photos Feat. Bebe Daniels

Bebe Daniels (1901 – 1971) was an American actress, singer, dancer, writer and producer. She began her career in Hollywood during the silent movie era as a child actress, became a star in musicals such as 42nd Street, and later gained further fame on radio and television in Britain. In a long career, Bebe Daniels made over 230 films.

By the age of seven Daniels had her first starring role in film as the young heroine in A Common Enemy. At the age of nine she starred as Dorothy Gale in the 1910 short film The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. At the age of fourteen she starred opposite film comedian Harold Lloyd in a series of Lonesome Luke two-reel comedies starting with the 1915 film Giving Them Fits. The two eventually developed a publicized romantic relationship and were known in Hollywood as “The Boy” and “The Girl.

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Bebe Daniels in Love Comes Along via

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Bebe Daniels via

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Bebe Daniels in What a Night! via

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Bebe Daniels Wedding Dress, 1923 via

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Bebe Daniels via

A Collection of Vintage Photos Feat. Greta Nissen

Greta Nissen (1906 – 1988) was a Norwegian-born American film and stage actress. Nissen was originally a dancer. She made her debut as a solo ballerina at the National Theatre in 1922. She toured Norway and participated in several Danish films.

In early 1924 she went as a member of a Danish ballet troupe to New York. There she was hired to do larger dance numbers. Here she was discovered by film producer Jesse L. Lasky of Paramount Pictures, and would appear in more than twenty films.

She was the original choice for leading lady in Hell’s Angels (1930), an epic film made by Howard Hughes. But she lost the part due to her strong Norwegian accent.

In 1933 she moved to England and In 1937 she retired from acting in films altogether.

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Greta Nissen via

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Greta Nissen via

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Greta Nissen via

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Greta Nissen via

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 Greta Nissen via

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 Greta Nissen in Fazil via

A Collection of Vintage Photos Featuring American Beauty Bille Dove

Billie Dove (1903-1997) was in her heyday known for her voluptuous femininity on the silent screen, rivaled that of Mary Pickford, Marion Davies and Clara Bow in popularity. She retired after only a few years into the talking picture era, however, and is not as well-remembered in today’s film circles as the aforementioned.

She was born Bertha Bohny to Swiss immigrant parents. As a teen, she worked as a model to help support her family and was hired as a teenager by Florenz “Flo” Ziegfeld to appear in his Ziegfeld Follies Revue.

However, a burgeoning affair between Dove and Ziegfeld prompted Ziegfeld’s wife Billie Burke to arrange work out West for the young starlet in Hollywood films. She soon became one of the most popular actresses of the 1920s, appearing in Douglas Fairbanks’ smash hit Technicolor film The Black Pirate (1926), as Rodeo West in The Painted Angel (1929), and was dubbed The American Beauty (1927), the title of one of her films.

She married the director of her seventh film, Irvin Willat, in 1923. The two divorced in 1929. Dove had a huge legion of male fans, one of her most persistent being Howard Hughes. She shared a three-year romance with Hughes and was engaged to marry him, but she ended the relationship without ever giving cause. Hughes cast her as a comedian in his film Cock of the Air (1932). She also appeared in his movie The Age for Love (1931).

Following her last film, Blondie of the Follies (1932), Dove retired from the screen to be with her family, although she was at the time still popular. She married oil executive Robert Kenaston in 1933.

Ziegfeld Model - Non-Risque - by Alfred Cheney Johnston

Billie Dove as a Ziegfield Follies Girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston via

Ziegfeld Model - Risque - 1920s - by Alfred Cheney Johnston

Billie Dove as a Ziegfield Follies Girl by Alfred Cheney Johnston via

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Billie Dove via

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Billie Dove as a Bride via

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Billie Dove via

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Billie Dove via

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Billæie Dove in Blondie of the Follies, her last film (1932) via

Billie Dove (Reprise)

Vintage Photos of Hungarian Vamp Lya de Putti

Lya De Putti (1897 – 1931) was a Hungarian film actress of the silent era, noted for her portrayal of vampcharacters.

She began her stage career on the Hungarian Vaudeville circuit. She soon progressed to Berlin, where after performing in the ballet, she made her screen debut in 1918. She became the premiere danseuse at the Berlin Winter Garden in 1924.

Around that time German film director Jol Mai noticed her and cast her in her first important film, The Mistress of the World. She followed this success with noteworthy performances in Manon Lescaut and Varieté (1925).

The actress came to America in February 1926. At the time she told reporters she was twenty-two years old. Her ocean liner’s records list her as having been twenty-six. De Putti was generally cast as a vamp character, and often wore her dark hair short, in a style similar to that of Louise Brooks or Colleen Moore.

In 1913, she married Zoltán Szepessy, a county magistrate. They divorced in 1918. The couple had two daughters, Ilona (b. 1914) and Judith (b. 1916).

The following year, De Putti went to Hollywood, but found little success there. Despite working with such distinguished actors as Adolphe Menjou and Zasu Pitts, she failed to make it big, and left the screen by 1929 to attempt to restart her career on Broadway.

Her Hollywood efforts were inhibited by her foreign accent. Later she went to England to make silent movies and studied the English language. Soon she returned to America to attempt talkies.

She died in 1931, aged 34, in the Harbor Sanitorium. She was hospitalized to have a chicken bone removed from her throat, and contracted a throat infection. She left just £800 and a few bits of jewellery. Four years earlier, £800 was her weekly wage. She is interred in the Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York.

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Lya De Putti postcard via

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Lia de Putti via

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Lya de Putti via

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 Lya de Putti & Eugen Klöpfer in Comedians, dir. Karl Grune, 1925 via

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Lya De Putti in “Sorrows of Satan”, 1926 via

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Lya de Putti via

A Collection of Photos Featuring Marie Doro

Marie Doro (b. 1882) was an American stage and film actress of the early silent film era. Like many other young ladies, she started out in the chorus in musical comedy productions. Marie Doro starred in at least 18 movies including ‘The Admirable Crichton’ in 1903, ‘Sherlock Holmes’ in 1905-06, ‘Electricity’ in 1910 and ‘Diplomacy’ in 1914. On tour of England in the mid 1900’s, she starred with the unknown teenage Charles Chaplin.

By the early 1920s Doro became increasingly disillusioned with Hollywood and her acting career. She returned to the Broadway stage one last time in 1921 with Josephine Drake in Lilies of the Field. She made two more feature films, the last of them being Sally Bishop, but left Hollywood in 1924, relocated to Europe for a time and made a number of films in Italy and the UK. Returning to the United States, she became increasingly reclusive and drawn to spiritual matters. After moving to New York City, she briefly studied at the Union Theological Seminary.

After returning to the United States, she spent the rest of her life in seclusion. She would often go on self-styled “retreats” in which she went to extremes to elude friends and acquaintances, even to the point of changing hotels four times a week.

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Marie Doro, circa 1900

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Marie Doro, circa 1900 via

Marie Doro by Bassano, 1913 via

Maria Doro via