Vintage Photos of Malt Shops Scenes (1940s-50s)

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Lana Turner in”Slightly Dangerous” (1943)

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Date at the malt shop (1940s)

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Teens gather at the counter of a local malt shop (1947)

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Teen Couple Playing Juke Box in Malt Shop with Other Teens in Booths (1950s)

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Teenagers on a date in a malt shop (1950s)

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Beautiful Victorian Portraits by Lady Clementina Hawarden

Lady Clementina Hawarden (1822 – 1865) was a noted portrait photographer of the Victorian Era.

She turned to photography in late 1857 or early 1858, whilst living on the estate of her husband’s family in Dundrum, Co. Tipperary, Ireland. A move to London in 1859 allowed her to set up a studio in her elegant home in South Kensington.

The furniture and characteristic decor of an upper-class London home was removed in order to create mise-en-scène images and theatrical poses within the first floor of her home – Hawarden’s characteristic portraits include her daughters Isabella Grace, Clementina, and Florence Elizabeth.

Hawarden produced albumen prints from wet-plate collodion negatives, a method commonly used at the time. Her work was widely acclaimed for its “artistic excellence”. Hawarden was considered an amateur photographer and while appreciated for her work, never became widely known as a photographer. Her photographic years were brief but prolific. Hawarden produced over eight hundred photographs from 1857-1864 before her sudden death. she died after suffering from pneumonia for one week, aged 42. It has been suggested that her immune system was weakened by constant contact with the photographic chemicals.

Her work is likened to Julia Margaret Cameron, another Victorian female photographer.

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A photograph that is possibly a self-portrait of Clementina, Lady Hawarden, taken in about 1862.

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Isabella by Clementina, Lady Hawarden

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Isabella by Lady Clementina Hawarden

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Clementina reading while sitting at the window wearing some kind of fancy dress or theatrical costume, ca. 1862-63 by Lady Clementina Hawarden.

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Clementina, reading a book by Clementina, Lady Hawarden

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France, Turn of the Century, by The Seeberger Brothers


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By Fréres Seeberger (Jules, Louis et Henri)

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By Fréres Seeberger (Jules, Louis et Henri)

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By Fréres Seeberger (Jules, Louis et Henri)

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By Fréres Seeberger (Jules, Louis et Henri)

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By Fréres Seeberger (Jules, Louis et Henri)

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Indian Summer by Dorothy Parker

In youth, it was a way I had
To do my best to please,
And change, with every passing lad,
To suit his theories.

But now I know the things I know,
And do the things I do;
And if you do not like me so,
To hell, my love, with you!

1920s Washington Beach Beauty Contest

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June 17, 1922. “Washington Ad Club bathing costume contest at Tidal Basin.” Miss Anna Niebel, “former Follies girl who lives at 1370 Harvard street northwest,” took first place. Harris & Ewing glass negative.

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August 5, 1922.”Washington Tidal Basin Beauty Contest” Seventeen-year-old Eva Fridell takes the loving cup from judge Isaac Gans. National Photo Company Collection glass negative.

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August 5, 1922.”Washington Tidal Basin Beauty Contest” Seventeen-year-old Eva Fridell takes the loving cup from judge Isaac Gans. National Photo Company Collection glass negative.

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August 5, 1922.”Washington Tidal Basin Beauty Contest” ” Misses Eva Fridell, 17, and Anna Niebel. National Photo Company glass negative.

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Four prize winners in the 1922 beauty show at Washington Bathing Beach, Washington, D.C. Left to right: Gay Gatley, Eva Fridell, Anna Neibel, Iola Swinnerton. National Photo Company Collection.

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Amazing Surreal Photomontages by Grete Stern

Grete Stern (1904-1999) was German born but adopted Argentine nationality after living in the country for 23 years.

In 1948 Stern was offered the unusual assignment of providing photos for a column on the interpretation of dreams in the popular weekly women’s magazine Idilio. The column, entitled “Psychoanalysis Will Help You,” was a response to dreams sent in by readers, mostly working-class women. It was written under the pseudonym Richard Rest by renowned sociologist Gino Germani, who later became a professor at Harvard University. The result was a series of about one hundred and fifty photomontages produced between 1948 and 1951 that show Stern’s avant-garde spirit. In these photomontages she portrays women’s oppression and submission in Argentine society with sarcastic and surreal images. The photomontage was an ideal way for Stern to express her ideas about the dominant values.

It has been claimed that the motivating semiotic principle behind Grete Stern’s photomontages is the need to create a language for women’s dreams; this language may be, in a first instance, sympathetic with the repression and oppres­sion of women, and in a second instance it may be critical of the pscyhoanalytic project with regard to women’s experience.

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“Little Little Man” by Alfonsina Storni (1892 – 1938)

Little little man, little little man,
set free your canary that wants to fly.
I am that canary, little little man,
leave me to fly.

I was in your cage, little little man,
little little man who gave me my cage.
I say “little little” because you don’t understand me
Nor will you understand.

Nor do I understand you, but meanwhile,
open for me the cage from which I want to escape.
Little little man, I loved you half an hour,
Don’t ask me again.