Vintage Photos by Renowned Fashion Photographer Frank Horvat

Frank Horvat was born in Opatija in 1928, that was then Italy and is now Croatia. He studied art in Milan; a meeting in 1951 with photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson decided his fate as a photojournalist. Today he is best known for his fashion photography, published between the mid 1950s and the end of the 1980s.

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Untitled by Frank Horvat (1962)

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Judy Dent, Yorkshire, for Vogue UK, by Frank Horvat (1961)

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A Givenchy hat photographed by Frank Horvat (1958)

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Françoise Sagan, writer, Paris by Frank Horvat (1959)

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Fashion in Streets by Frank Horvat

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Deborah Dixon & Marcello Mastroianni, Rome, by Frank Horvat for Harper´s Bazar (1962)

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Paris, for Élegance, Judy Dent by Frank Horvat (1961)

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Ernest Hemingway & Elizabeth Hadley Richardson Wedding (1921)

Ernest Hemingway and Elizabeth Hadley Richardson married after a courtship of less than a year, on September 3th 1921, in Horton Bay, Michigan. Hedley was 8 years older than Ernest, and the first of his four wives. Bernice Kert, author of The Hemingway Women, claims Hadley was “evocative” of the woman whom Hemingway met and fell in love with during his recuperation from injuries during World War I, Agnes von Kurowsky, but in Hadley, Hemingway saw a childishness Agnes lacked.

The couple spent their honeymoon at the Hemingway family summer cottage on Walloon Lake. The weather was miserable, and both Hadley and Hemingway came down with fever, sore throat, and cough. The couple returned to Chicago after their honeymoon, but within months they moved to Paris, where he worked as a foreign correspondent and fell under the influence of the modernist writers and artists of the 1920s “Lost Generation” expatriate community.

Of Hemingway’s marriage to Hadley, Hemingway biographer Jeffrey Meyers claims: “With Hadley, Hemingway achieved everything he had hoped for with Agnes:

“the love of a beautiful woman, a comfortable income, a life in Europe.”

Their marriage disintegrated as Hemingway was writing and revising The Sun Also Rises.  In 1925 Hadley became aware of Hemingway´s affair with American journalist Pauline Pfeiffer. The couple divorced in January 1927, and Hemingway married Pfeiffer in May the same year. In 1933 Hadley married a second time, to journalist Paul Mowrer, whom she met in Paris.

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Hadley on her wedding day in 1921

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Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley, on their wedding day in 1921

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Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley, on their wedding day in 1921

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Famous Flappers of the Roaring Twenties

Flappers were a “new breed” of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.

Flappers had their origins in the liberal period of the Roaring Twenties, the social, political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of World War I, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe.

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Zelda Fitzgerald was an American socialite and novelist, and the wife of American author F. Scott Fitzgerald, who dubbed her “the first American Flapper”. She and Scott became the emblem of the Jazz Age, for which they are still celebrated. Photo: via tumblr.com

1926: Hollywood film star, Clara Bow (1905 - 1965) in a shiny strapless dress. (Photo by Eugene Robert Richee)

Clara Bow epitomized the Roaring Twenties’ flapper. At only 25, she retired exhausted by repeated scandals about her presumed sexual life. Photo: Bow in a shiny strapless dress by Eugene Robert Richee, 1926 via theredlist.com

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 Coleen Moore was Bow´s “chief rival”. After Bow took the stage Moore gradually lost her momentum. In spring 1924 she made a good, but unsuccessful effort to top Bow in The Perfect Flapper, and soon after she dismissed the whole flapper vogue. Photo: Coleen Moore in “Why Be Good?”, 1929 via livejournal.com

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Louise Brooks was an American dancer and actress noted as an iconic symbol of the flapper, and for popularizing the bobbed haircut. Photo: 1920s via theredlist.com

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Gilda Gray was an American actress and dancer who popularized a dance called the “shimmy” which became fashionable in 1920s films and theater productions. Photo: 1924, Paris via rebrn.com

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Tallulah Brockman Bankhead was an American actress of the stage and screen, and a reputed libertine. Photo: 1922 via britannica.com

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Anita Loos was an American screenwriter, playwright and author, best known for her blockbuster comic novel, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes first published in 1925. It was one of several famous novels published that year that chronicled the so-called Jazz Age – including Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Photo: Loos, on page 12 of the April 1922 Photoplay via wiki