Vintage Venice Photogravures (1896)

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Photogravure, Basilica St. Mark,  Church Detail, Venice, Italy, 1896

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Photogravure, Basilica St. Mark Church, Venice, Italy, 1896 via

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Photogravure, Bronze Gate, Statues, Campanile, Venice, Italy, 1896 via

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 Photogravure of the courtyard fountain of Ducal Palace, Venice, Italy, 1896 via

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Photogravure, Palace Vendramin Calergi, Grand Canal, Cannaregio, Venice, 1896 via

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Photogravure, , Main Entrance Architecture, Venice, Italy, 1896 via

A Collection of Victorian “Carte de Visites”

The carte de visite was a type of small photograph which was patented in Paris by photographer André Adolphe Eugène Disdéri in 1854.  It was a small, cheap portrait format which made photography available to the masses.

It was usually made of an albumen print, which was a thin paper photograph mounted on a thicker paper card.

The Carte de Visite was slow to gain widespread use until 1859, when Disdéri published Emperor Napoleon III’s photos in this format. This made the format an overnight success.

The new invention was so popular it was known as “cardomania”and it spread throughout Europe and then quickly to America and the rest of the world.

The immense popularity of these card photographs led to the publication and collection of photographs of prominent persons.

Each photograph was the size of a visiting card, and such photograph cards were traded among friends and visitors.

Albums for the collection and display of cards became a common fixture in Victorian parlors.

By the early 1870s, cartes de visite were supplanted by “cabinet cards,” which were also usually albumen prints, but larger, mounted on cardboard backs.

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Contemporary carte de visite, 1860s via

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Victorian carte de visite circa 1880s via

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One of the first cartes de visite of Queen Victoria taken by photographer John Jabez Edwin Mayall via

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Napoléon III and his wife Eugenie, cartes de visite by Disderi, circa 1865 via

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Carte de visite photograph of Ella Wesner, circa 1872, the most celebrated male impersonator of the Gilded Age Vaudeville circuit. via

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 1860s original/vintage albumen carte de visite of a lovely young California bride in her flowing white wedding dress taken by the pioneer daguerreotypist from San Francisco, William Shew via

Eldon House (1895)

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Interior view of Eldon House, 1895 – note the abundance of bric-a-brac and elaborate Victorian furnishings. Eldon House was built in 1834 for John Harris, Treasurer of the London District, and occupied by his family – his wife Amelia and their eight children. It was first named Eldon Terrace, shortly thereafter changed to Eldon House – via lib.uwo.ca

Lillian Russell as Patience (1882)

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Patience is a comic opera in two acts with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. The opera is a satire on the aesthetic movement of the 1870s and ’80s in England and, more broadly, on fads, superficiality, vanity, hypocrisy and pretentiousness; it also satirizes romantic love, rural simplicity and military bluster. Photo: Lillian Russell as Patience at the Bijou Opera House in New York, 1882 via

Photographs feat. Samurais (ca. 1880s)

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Unknown, Photograph of a Samurai in full armor, wielding a bow and arrow. Attributed to Kimbei, c. 1880 via

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Unknown Photograph of a Samurai  standing on a woodland path, outfitted with swords and full armor, wearing a rain cape and holding a jingasa, c. 1880 via