Early Film Dancer Annabelle Moore (1878-1961)

Annabelle Moore (1878 – 1961) was an American dancer and actress who was quite popular in her youth. She appeared in at least nine films beween 1894 and 1897. The films were dance films and included “A Mermaid Dance”, “Butterfly Dance” and “Serpentine Dance”.

The sale of her films was further boosted in December 1896 when it was revealed that she had been approached to appear naked at a private dinner party at Sherry’s Restaurant – It is even said she introduced eroticism in film.

In 1907 Annabelle starred as the Gibson Bathing Girl in the first of  the Ziegfeld Follies.

In 1910 she married Edward James Buchan. He died in 1958 and Annabelle died penniless in Chicago in 1961. In her obituary in the New York Times it was said Annabelle:

“was the symbol of beauty in her day. She was billed as ‘the original Gibson Girl’ because of her striking resemblance to the Charles Dana Gibson portrait.”

Annabelle had a similar appearance to the Gibson Girl.  But as far as Gibson modeling his idealization of the perfect woman on Annabelle, there is little evidence that he did (source).

moore2

Annabelle Moore, 1900s

via

tumblr.com

moooe

Annabelle Moore, 1908

via

stuffnobodycaresabout.com

Annabelle Butterfly Dance (1894)

Ziegfeld Girl Anna Held

Helene Held  (1872 – 1918) was a Polish-born French stage performer and singer, most often associated with impresario Florenz Ziegfeld, her common-law husband.

Touring through Europe, Held was appearing in London in 1896 when she met Florenz Ziegfeld. Ziegfeld asked her to return to New York City with him and she agreed. He set about creating a wave of public interest in her, by feeding stories about her to the American press, such as her having had ribs surgically removed.

From 1905, Held enjoyed several successes on Broadway which, apart from bolstering Ziegfeld’s fortune, made her a millionaire in her own right. Ziegfeld’s talent for creating publicity stunts ensured that Held’s name remained well known. Held suggested the format for what would eventually become the famous Ziegfeld Follies in 1907, and helped Ziegfeld establish the most lucrative phase of his career.

In 1909, Ziegfeld began an affair with the actress Lillian Lorraine; Held remained hopeful that his fascination would pass and he would return to her, but instead he turned his attentions to another actress Billie Burke, whom he would marry in 1914.

The film The Great Ziegfeld (1936) tells a sanitized version of the story of the Ziegfeld-Held relationship. Luise Rainer won an Academy Award for her performance as Held.

Annex - Held, Anna_02

Anna Held

via

doctormacro.com

annah

Anna Held

via

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/389772542723817697/

Mack Sennett´s “Bathing Beauties”

According to laphamsquarterly.org Mack Sennett gave Chaplin, Arbuckle, and Mabel Normand their first breaks, and was one of the founding patrons of comedy. But Sennett was also responsible for the concept of the “Bathing Beauty”—and, by extension, filmic eye-candy as we know it today.

The “bathing beauties,” themselves, were a  a group of young starlets who appeared bare-legged in Sennett’s comedies. They were particularly popular and became pin-up girls for the soldiers of the First World War. They included Gloria Swanson, Marie Prevost, Phyllis Haver, Juanita Hansen, Claire Anderson, and Mary Thurman.

The sex appeal of these young actresses raised the ire of some temperance activists, and Sennett received hundreds of letters protesting his exploitation of these women’s bodies. Despite such protests, the bathing beauties remained quite popular.

The Sennett Bathing Beauties would continue to appear through 1928.

mack-sennett-bathing-beauties-0

1915

via

wordpress.com

1915_2

1915

via

retronaut.com

marv

Marvel Rea, 1919

via

shorpy.com

bathing belles

Bathing Beauties

Credit: Collection of Dave and Ali Stevenson

via

looserthanloose.com

1915_1

1915

via

retronaut.com

1915_3

1915

via

retronaut.com

lombard1928

 Carole Lombard and Mack Sennett; far right, with a white hat and dark suit. It was taken during a seaside shoot in 1928, while Lombard was part of Sennett’s troupe.

via

livejournal.com

Ziegfeld Follies Girls – Vintage Photos

The Ziegfeld Follies were a series of elaborate theatrical productions on Broadway in New York City from 1907 through 1931. It was founded by Florenz Ziegfeld and his wife Anna Held in 1907  – the inspiration was the Parisian Folies Bergère.

The Ziegfeld Follies were also famous for many beautiful chorus girls commonly known as Ziegfeld girls, usually wearing elaborate costumes by designers such as Erté, Lady Duff Gordon or Ben Ali Haggin.

Ziegfeld girl, Marion Benda c. 1920’s

via

tumblr.com

The Follies circa 1920. Photograph by Édouard Boubat

via

tumblr.com

Lilyan Tashman performing in Ziegfeld follies

via

tumblr.com

Ziegfeld Follies by Alfred Cheney Johnston

via

pinterest.com

Ziegfeld Girl Mary Eaton by Alfred Cheney Johnston

via

tumblr.com

Mary Pickford by Alfred Cheney Johnston

via

theredlist.com

Ziegfeld_Follies_13

Ziegfeld Follies

via

xaxor.com

Ziegfeld_Follies_48

Ziegfeld Follies

via

xaxor.com

Ziegfield Follies, photo by Alfred Cheney Johnston

via

theredlist.com

Ziegfield Follies, photo by Alfred Cheney Johnston

via

theredlist.com