The Amazing Lauren Bacall by Nina Leen for Life Magazine (1945)

Lauren Bacall (1924 – 2014) began her career in the 1940s as a model, before making her debut as a leading lady with Humphrey Bogart in the film To Have and Have Not in 1944. She continued in the film noir genre with appearances with Bogart in The Big Sleep (1946), Dark Passage (1947), and Key Largo (1948).

 

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Portrait of Lauren Bacall by Nina Leen, 1945 via

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Portrait of Lauren Bacall by Nina Leen, 1945 via

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Portrait of Lauren Bacall by Nina Leen, 1945 via

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Portrait of Lauren Bacall by Nina Leen, 1945 via

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Portrait of Lauren Bacall by Nina Leen, 1945 via

 

Amazing Still lifes by Edward Weston

Edward Weston (1886 – 1958) was one of the most innovative and influential American photographers. He was also a great still life photographer.

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Edward Weston, Eggplant on Plate via

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Edward Weston, Artichoke, Halved, 1930 via

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Edward Weston, Cabbage Leaf, 1931 via

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Edward Weston, Dunes, Oceano, California, 1936 via

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Edward Weston, Clouds, Death Valley, 1938 via

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Edward Weston, Cypress, Point Lobos, 1944 via

Ingrid Bergman in War Romance Arch of Triumph (1948)

Arch of Triumph is a 1948 American war romance film starring Ingrid Bergman, Charles Boyer and Charles Laughton. It was directed by Lewis Milestone and is based on the 1945 novel Arch of Triumph by Erich Maria Remarque, which he wrote during his nine-year exile in the United States.

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Portrait of Ingrid Bergman in Arch of Triumph directed by Lewis Milestone, 1948. Photo by Peter Stackpole via

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Portrait of Ingrid Bergman in Arch of Triumph directed by Lewis Milestone, 1948. Photo by Peter Stackpole via

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Portrait of Ingrid Bergman in Arch of Triumph directed by Lewis Milestone, 1948. Photo by Peter Stackpole via

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Portrait of Ingrid Bergman in Arch of Triumph directed by Lewis Milestone, 1948. Photo by Peter Stackpole via

Vintage Cinema Photos of Actresses Playing Nuns

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Portrait of Audrey Hepburn in The Nun’s Story directed by Fred Zinnemann, 1959 via

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Joan Collins for the Sea wife, 1957 via

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Portrait of Ingrid Bergman in The Bell’s of St. Mary’s directed by Leo McCarey, 1945. Photo by Ralph Crane via

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Anna Karine in La religieuse directed by Jacques Rivette, 1966 via

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Deborah Kerr in Black Narcissus directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1947 via

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Julie Andrews and Peggy Wood in The Sound of Music directed by Robert Wise, 1965 via

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Debbie Reynolds in The Singing Nun directed by Henry Koster, 1966 via

 

Vivien Leigh in Caesar and Cleopatra (1945)

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1945: Vivien Leigh (1913 – 1967) in her costume for George Bernard Shaw’s ‘Caesar and Cleopatra’, directed in Technicolour by Gabriel Pascal at Denham Studios. 

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1945: Vivien Leigh (1913 – 1967) in her costume for George Bernard Shaw’s ‘Caesar and Cleopatra’, directed in Technicolour by Gabriel Pascal at Denham Studios.

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Marvelous Portraits by Edward Weston

Edward Henry Weston (1886 – 1958) was a 20th-century American photographer. He has been called:

“one of the most innovative and influential American photographers…” and “one of the masters of 20th century photography.”

Over the course of his 40-year career Weston photographed an increasingly expansive set of subjects, including landscapes, still lifes, nudes, portraits, genre scenes and even whimsical parodies. It is said that he developed a:

“quintessentially American, and specially Californian, approach to modern photography”

because of his focus on the people and places of the American West. In 1937 Weston was the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship, and over the next two years he produced nearly 1,400 negatives using his 8 × 10 view camera. Some of his most famous photographs were taken of the trees and rocks at Point Lobos, California, near where he lived for many years.

Weston was born in Chicago and moved to California when he was 21. He knew he wanted to be a photographer from an early age, and initially his work was typical of the soft focus pictorialism that was popular at the time. Within a few years, however, he abandoned that style and went on to be one of the foremost champions of highly detailed photographic images.

In 1947 he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and he stopped photographing soon thereafter. He spent the remaining ten years of his life overseeing the printing of more than 1,000 of his most famous images.

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Edward Weston, Portrait of Ruth St. Denis, 1916 via

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Edward Weston, Unidentified Woman, 1920 via

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Tina Modotti, Glendale. Photograph by Edward Weston, 1921 via

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Edward Weston. Frida Kahlo, 1930 via

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Xenia Kashevaroff photographed by Edward Weston in 1931. This portrait is now in the collection of New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art via

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Edward Weston, Charis Wilson, 1941 The Lane Collection
Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston via