Portraits of Hollywood Actresses by Albert Witzel (1920s)

Witzel Studios was founded in Los Angeles by photographer Albert Walter Witzel (1879–1929) in 1909 and within a few years had become one of the city’s foremost portrait studios.

The rise of the business paralleled the emergence of the film industry following its relocation from the east coast, and Witzel was soon in demand from Hollywood studios seeking to create interest in movies by circulating promo shots of their stars. Distinguished by moody lighting and dramatic poses and settings, Witzel’s photos soon set the tone for Hollywood studio photography and from the mid-1910s they featured frequently in fan magazines like Photoplay, becoming an important promotional and publicity tool.

Witzel occasionally worked on assignment for the big picture studios, photographing many silent film luminaries including Theda Bara and Charlie Chaplin (source).

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Portrait of American actress Clara Bow by American photographer Albert Witzel (1879-1929) via

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Portrait of American actress & showgirl Blanche Mehaffey Witzel, 1920s by Albert Witzel (1879-1929) via

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Portrait of Bebe Daniels by photographer Albert Witzel (1879-1929), 1920 via

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Portrait of American actress Natalie Kingston by Albert Witzel (1879-1929) via

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Portrait of American actress Melva Cornell by Albert Witzel (1879-1929), 1920s via

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Portrait of American actress Bessie Love by Albert Witzel (1879-1929), 1920 via

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Portrait of American actress Doris May by Albert Witzel (1879-1929) , 1920 via

Photographs of Paris by Pierre-Yves Petit aka ‘Yvon’ (1920)

Born in Bordeaux in 1886, Jean Pierre Yves Petit moved to the French capital as a young man; there he parlayed a childhood passion for photography into a job at the august culture magazine L’Illustration. Adopting the pen name Yvon (to avoid confusion with a popular portrait photographer named Pierre Petit), he published his first photo essay in 1919: “Ciels et Reflets de Paris” (“Skies and Reflections of Paris”), a series of six melancholy cityscapes in which overcast skies played a starring role (source).

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Background by by Pierre-Yves Petit (Yvon), 1920 via

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Gargoyles on Notre Dame by Pierre-Yves Petit (Yvon), 1920 via

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Scene from Paris by Pierre-Yves Petit (Yvon), 1920s via

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Scene from Paris by Pierre-Yves Petit (Yvon), 1920s via

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Scene from Paris by Pierre-Yves Petit (Yvon), 1920s via

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Le jardin du Palais Royal à Paris by Pierre-Yves Petit (Yvon), 1920 via

A Collection of Photos by André de Dienes

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André de Dienes, Marilyn Monroe, 1946 via

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Ingrid Bergman by Andre de Dienes, c. 1944 via

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André de Dienes, Josu Kerr, 1950 via

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André de Dienes, Carolyn Conner, from Beverly Hills, CA, 1950s via

A Collection of Photos by Henri Cartier-Bresson (1950s)

Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908 – 2004) was a French humanist photographer considered a master of candid photography, and an early user of 35 mm film. He pioneered the genre of street photography, and viewed photography as capturing a decisive moment.

Cartier-Bresson was one of the founding members of Magnum Photos in 1947. In the 1970s he took up drawing—he had studied painting in the 1920s.

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Henri Cartier-Bresson “Generations”, East Sussex. Brighton, UK via

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Henri Cartier-Bresson Girl in Crowd Wearing Pearls, Velodrome d’Hiver via

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Henri Cartier-Bresson Colette and Her Companion, 1952 via

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Henri Cartier-Bresson Bullfighters, Pamplona, July 1952 via

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Henri Cartier-Bresson Women in Traditional Dress of Brittany (Bretagne) via

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Henri Cartier-Bresson Woman Shopping with Children, Lourdes, 1958 via