A Collection of Self-Portraits by Gertrud Arndt (1930s)

Gertrud Arndt (1903 – 2000) was a photographer associated with the Bauhaus movement. She is remembered for her pioneering series of self-portraits from around 1930.

Over the five years she captured herself and her friends in various styles, costumes and settings in the series known as Maskenportäts (Masked Portraits). Although at the time Arndt refused to attribute any deep artistic meaning to her photographs, they were imaginative and provocative. Through her costumes, Arndt created playful reinterpretations of such feminine tropes as the widow, socialite, and a little girl.

The viewer is confronted with Arndt head on, unable to ignore the expression communicated by her face and the accessories that framed it. In an interview as a nonagenarian, Arndt told Sabina Leßmann, “I am simply interested in the face, what does one make from a face? There you only need to open your eyes wide and already you are someone else. Isn’t that true?”. Today Arndt is considered to be a pioneer of female self-portraiture, her work echoing in that of Cindy Sherman and Sophie Calle.

gertrud-arndt-self-portrait

Gertrud Arndt, self-portrait via

357642

Self Portrait© Gertrud Arndt via

c68c7d03da098c04

Gertrud Arndt, Maskenportrait Nr. 29, via

Gertrud-Arndt_Maskenfoto_Nr19_1930_copyright-VG-Bild-Kunst-Bonn-916x1024

Gertrud Arndt, Maskenfoto, um 1930 Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin © VG Bild‐Kunst, Bonn 2016 via

gertrud-arndt-mask-portrait-no-13-1930

Mask portrait No. 131 by Gertrud Arndt, 1930 via

A Collection of Victorian Era Portraits by Lady Clementina Hawarden (1860s)

Clementina Maude, Viscountess Hawarden, née Clementina Elphinstone Fleeming (1822 – 1865), commonly known as Lady Clementina Hawarden, was a noted English portrait amateur photographer of the Victorian Era, producing over 800 photographs mostly of her adolescent daughter.

medium_1985_5078_9

A photograph of a young woman in a dancing costume, possibly Isabella Hawarden (b. 1846), taken by Clementina, Lady Hawarden, in about 1863 © The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum via

medium_1985_5078_4

A photograph of Isabella Grace Hawarden (b. 1846) taken by her mother, Clementina, Lady Hawarden, in about 1862 © The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum via

medium_1985_5078_6

Two women by window, one standing and one kneeling. A photograph of two young girls, probably Clementina (b. 1847) and Florence Hawarden (b. 1849), taken by Clementina, Lady Hawarden, in about 1860 © The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum via

1985-5078|1985-5078/2

Portrait of ‘Clementina Maude’ by Lady Clementina Hawarden, albumen print, 1863, woman reading seated beside window © The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum via

medium_1985_5078_1

Woman on balcony. A photograph of Clementina Hawarden (b. 1847), taken by her mother, Viscountess Clementina Hawarden in about 1862 © The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum via

Amazing Victorian Photography by Julia Margaret Cameron

Cameron,_Julia_Margaret_-_»Die_Tochter_des_Gärtners«_(Zeno_Fotografie)

The Gardener’s Daughter by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1867 via

Magdalene_Brookfield,_by_Julia_Margaret_Cameron

Magdalene Brookfield by Julia Margaret, 1865 via

800px-Mary_Ann_Hillier,_by_Julia_Margaret_Cameron

Mary Ann Hillier by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1873 via

Lionel_Tennyson_with_bow_&_arrow,_by_Julia_Margaret_Cameron

Lionel Tennyson with bow & arrow by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1863 via

Cameron,_Julia_Margaret_-_The_Rosebud_Garden_of_Girls_-_Google_Art_Project

The Rosebud Garden of Girls by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1868 via

Gretchen,_by_Julia_Margaret_Cameron

Gretchen by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1870 via

 

Helmut Newton “Model in Venice” (1966)

mobilejpegupload_2B7F867F8A984A08BA76AEC9A4D3AFD3_master

Model in Venice’ is taken in a rare location for Newton: Venice. While its romanticism was a source of great inspiration for Newton, he only shot in the city on a handful of occasions, here for Queen Magazine in 1966 with clothes by Femme 90- an avant-garde designer at the time. Venice appealed to Newton for its water and elegance of the vaporetto. Here, the model’s clothing sprays in the wind, leaving her enigmatically anonymous via