Portraits of Jean Harlow in Dinner at Eight (1933)

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Portrait of Jean Harlow in Dinner at Eight directed by George Cukor, 1933. Photo by George Hurrell via

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Portrait of Jean Harlow in Dinner at Eight directed by George Cukor, 1933. Photo by George Hurrell via

Gloria Swanson Wearing Chanel in Tonight or Never (1931)

Tonight or Never is a 1931 American pre-Code comedy film directed by Mervyn LeRoy, starring Gloria Swanson and featuring Boris Karloff. Nella Vargo (Swanson) is a Hungarian prima donna whose latest performances include singing Tosca in Venice. Although she is praised by the audience, her music teacher Rudig feels that she can not be the greatest opera singer in history until she performs in New York City. When she is criticized for not putting her soul into the song, she gets mad, until she suddenly notices a mysterious man walking on the street. She becomes smitten with the man, until Rudig claims that he is a gigolo whose latest client is Marchesa Bianca San Giovanni, a former diva with a notorious past.

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Gloria Swanson in Tonight or Never directed by Mervyn LeRoy, 1931. Dress by Coco Chanel via

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Gloria Swanson in Tonight or Never directed by Mervyn LeRoy, 1931. Dress by Coco Chanel via

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Gloria Swanson in Tonight or Never directed by Mervyn LeRoy, 1931. Dress by Coco Chanel via

Annemarie Heinrich – German/Argentine photographer

Annemarie Heinrich (1912 – 2005) was a German-born, naturalized Argentine photographer. Heinrich is considered one of Argentina’s most important photographers. She specialized in portraits and nudity.

Heinrich was born in Darmstadt and moved to Larroque, Entre Ríos with her family in 1926, fleeing from the First World War. In 1930 she opened her first studio in Buenos Aires.

Two years later she moved to a larger studio, and began photographing actors from the Teatro Colón. Her photos were also the cover of magazines such as El HogarSintoníaAlta SociedadRadiolandia and Antena for forty years. She is known for having photographed various celebrities of Argentine cinema, such as Tita Merello, Carmen Miranda, Zully Moreno and Mirtha Legrand; as well as other cultural personalities like Jorge Luis Borges, Pablo Neruda and Eva Perón.

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By Annemarie Heinrich

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By Annemarie Heinrich

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By Annemarie Heinrich

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By Annemarie Heinrich

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By Annemarie Heinrich

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By Annemarie Heinrich

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By Annemarie Heinrich

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By Annemarie Heinrich

Amazing Vintage Portraits by Madame d’Ora (1910s-1920s)

Dora Philippine Kallmus (1881 – October 28, 1963) was an Austrian-Jewish fashion and portrait photographer who went by the name Madame D’ora. Dora, born in Vienna in 1881, came from a respected family of Jewish lawyers. In 1905 she was the first woman to be admitted to theory courses at the Graphische Lehr- und Versuchsanstalt. That same year she became a member of the Vienna Photographic Society. She trained at Nicola Perscheid’s studio in Berlin, where she became friends with his assistant Arthur Benda. In 1907 she opened a photography studio with Benda in Vienna called the Benda-D’Ora Studio. What followed was  a distinguished career as a salon photographer. In 1925, she moved her atelier to Paris, and during the 30s and 40s rose to international prominence through society and high fashion photography. Both her er studios in Vienna and Paris became fashionable meeting places for the cultural and intellectual elite. In Vienna she had  become extremely popular among the Austro-Hungarian aristocracy.

Her subjects included intellectuals, dancers, actors, painters, and writers, fx.  Josephine Baker, Tamara de Lempicka, Maurice Chevalier, Colette, Niddy Impekoven. These vibrant portraits of twentieth-century artists and intellectuals remain important testaments to European cultural life at the turn of the century and beyond.

According to Jewish Women Encyclopedia D’Ora was one of the first photographers to focus on the emerging areas of modern, expressive dance and fashion, particularly after 1920, when fashion photographs started to replace drawings in magazines. While her photographic technique was not radical, her avant-garde subject matter was a risky choice. D’Ora’s photographs captured her clients’ individuality with new, natural positions in contrast to stiff, old-fashioned poses. D’Ora’s achievements also paved the way for other European women’s careers in photography, an area in which many Jewish women in particular found success.

When the Germans invaded France, Madame D’ora fled to a convent in the country side.  Dora returned to France in 1946 and re-opened the studio.

In 1959 she was involved in a serious traffic accident that left her an invalid. She died in Frohnleiten, Steiermark, Austria, in 1963.

Marie Conte by Madame d’Ora

Dora Kallmus (Madame d’Ora) & Arthur Benda - Fashion study, Vienna c.1920.

Fashion study by Madame d’Ora & Arthur Benda. Vienna, ca 1920.

Portrait of an unknown lady by Madame d’Ora, 1925