Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy by Lisa Larsen (1953)

Lisa Larsen (1925-1959) was one of LIFE’s poioneering female photojournalists. Born in Germany, she moved to the United States as a teenager. She started out as a picture file clerk at Black Star, but soon became a freelance photographer for many publications, including Vogue, The New York Times, Parade, Glamour, Charm, Holiday, and LIFE.

After 1948, the bulk of Larsen’s photojournalism was contract work for LIFE. In the beginning of her career at the influential magazine, she was assigned mainly entertainment and fashion stories, such as photographing the Vanderbilts, Kennedys, Bing Crosby, and the Duke of Windsor as well as the Greenbriar Hotel (source).

Bouvier and Kennedy were married on September 12, 1953, at St. Mary’s Church in Newport, Rhode Island, in a Mass celebrated by Boston’s Archbishop Richard Cushing. The wedding was considered the social event of the season with an estimated 700 guests at the ceremony and 1,200 at the reception that followed at Hammersmith Farm. The wedding dress, now housed in the Kennedy Library in Boston, Massachusetts, and the dresses of her attendants were created by designer Ann Lowe of New York City.

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Lisa Larsen, Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy, September 1953 via

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Lisa Larsen, Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy, September 1953 via

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Lisa Larsen, Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy, September 1953 via

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Lisa Larsen, John and Jacqueline Kennedy at Their Wedding Reception, September 1953 via

Beautiful Vintage Photos of 1920s Paris by André Kertész

André Kertész (1894 – 1985), born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay.

In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition.

Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.

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André Kertész, “Latin Quarter,” Paris, 1926 via

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André Kertész – A Window on the Quai Voltaire, Paris, 1928 via

 

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André Kertész ”Carnival, Paris (woman reading behind stage)” 1926 Gelatin silver print 10 3/4 x 13 inches © Courtesy Estate of André Kertész/Higher Pictures 2007 via

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André Kertész, My Friends at Cafe du Dome, 1928 via

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André Kertész Untitled (La fontaine de la Place de la Concorde), Paris, 1925 via

Amazing Portraits of Writers and Artists by Gisèle Freund

Gisèle Freund (1908  – 2000) was a German-born French photographer and photojournalist, famous for her documentary photography and portraits of writers and artists. Her best-known book is Photographie et société (1974) about the uses and abuses of the photographic medium in the age of technological reproduction. In 1977, she became President of the French Association of Photographers, and in 1981, she took the official portrait of French President François Mitterrand.

She was made Officier des Arts et Lettres in 1982 and Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur, the highest decoration in France, in 1983. In 1991, she became the first photographer to be honored with a retrospective at the Musée National d’art Moderne in Paris (Centre Georges Pompidou).

Freund’s major contributions to photography include using the Leica (with its 36 frames) for documentary reportage and her early experimentation with Kodachrome and 35 mm Agfacolor, which allowed her to develop a “uniquely candid portraiture style” that distinguishes her in 20th century photography.

She is buried at the Montparnasse Cemetery in Paris, France near her home and studio at 12 rue Lalande.

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Anouk Aimée by Gisèle Freund, 1962 via

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Colette by Gisèle Freund, 1954 via

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund via

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Simone de Beauvoir by Gisèle Freund (The day of the Prix Goncourt, next to a window writing), Paris, 1954 via

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Zsa Zsa Gabor, 1953 via

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Evita Perón, doing her hair (Reportage for Life magazine, 1950) © Gisèle Freund via

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Gisèle Freund, Self-Portrait via

A Collection of Photos Feat. Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund (1950s)

Gisèle Freund (1908 –  2000) was a German-born French photographer and photojournalist, famous for her documentary photography and portraits of writers and artists.

In 1950 Freund´s photocoverage of a bejewelled Eva Peron for Life Magazine caused a diplomatic stir between the United States and Argentina —  the ostentatious photographs went against the official party line of austerity. Life Magazine was blacklisted in Argentina and Freund had to escape the country.

Freund embarked on a two-week trip to Mexico, but she wouldn’t leave until two years later. There she met the legendary couple Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Welcomed into their home, she immersed herself in their private lives and the cultural and artistic diversity of the country, taking hundreds of photographs (source).

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952 via

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952 via

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952 via

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952 via

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952 via

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952 via

A Collection of Photos by Eva Besnyö

Photographer and photojournalist Eva Besnyö was born in Budapest on April 29, 1910, who participated in the Nieuwe Fotografie (New Photography) movement.

In 1928 she began a two-year course of studies at the renowned József Pécsi Portrait, Advertising and Architecture Studio, where she also did her apprenticeship. In 1930 at the age of 20 she decided to move to Berlin, metropolis of the avant-garde, not only in order to get away from home but also in order to leave the Hungary of the Horthy regime. Later she referred to her stay in Berlin as the most important period of her life, meaning that it laid the foundations not only of her photographic practice but also of her political awareness. She became part of the social and political circle of intellectuals which included György Kepes, Joris Ivens, Lászlo Moholy-Nagy, Otto Umbehr and Robert Capa. In 1931, she opened her own studio where she was successful in receiving agency work. Her well-known photograph of the gipsy boy with a cello on his back stems from that period.

Beacause of the political climate she moved to Amsterdam in 1932 with her Dutch friend John Fernhout whom she married. With the assistance of Charley Toorop, she participated in exhibitions which led to commissions in press photography, portraits, fashion and architecture. Her solo exhibition in the Van Lier art gallery in 1933 consolidated her recognition in the Netherlands. Besnyö experienced a further breakthrough with her architectural photography only a few years later: translating the idea of functionalist “New Building” into a “New Seeing”

After the war she again received commissions for documentary work but became less active as she raised her two children fathered by the graphic designer Wim Brusse. In the 1970s, she was active in the Dutch feminist movement Dolle Mina, fighting for equal rights and photographing street protests

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Eva Besnyö, Selfportrait, 1952

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Eva Besnyö, 1939

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Eva Besnyö, Budapest, 1929

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Eva Besnyö, Shadow play web

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Eva Besnyö

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Eva Besnyö

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Eva Besnyö

The “Ostentatious” Photos of Evita Perón in Life Magazine (1950)

In 1950 Gisèle Freund´s photocoverage of a bejewelled Eva Peron for Life Magazine caused a diplomatic stir between the United States and Argentina and upset many of Peron’s supporters—the ostentatious photographs went against the official party line of austerity; Life Magazine was blacklisted in Argentina, Freund had to escape the country with her negatives.

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Evita Perón, on national holiday, Buenos Aires, 1950
Black-and-white photograph; Fiber Base Silver Gelatine Print; white outline borde via

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Evita Perón, preparing for National Holiday, Buenos Aires, 1950
Black-and-white photograph; Fiber Base Silver Gelatine Print; white outline borde via

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Evita Perón, plays with her two poodles, Buenos Aires, 1950
Black-and-white photograph; Fiber Base Silver Gelatine Print; white outlin via

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Evita Perón, shows her hat collection, Buenos Aires, 1950
Black-and-white photograph; Fiber Base Silver Gelatine Print; white outline border via