Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy by Lisa Larsen (1953)

Lisa Larsen (1925-1959) was one of LIFE’s poioneering female photojournalists. Born in Germany, she moved to the United States as a teenager. She started out as a picture file clerk at Black Star, but soon became a freelance photographer for many publications, including Vogue, The New York Times, Parade, Glamour, Charm, Holiday, and LIFE.

After 1948, the bulk of Larsen’s photojournalism was contract work for LIFE. In the beginning of her career at the influential magazine, she was assigned mainly entertainment and fashion stories, such as photographing the Vanderbilts, Kennedys, Bing Crosby, and the Duke of Windsor as well as the Greenbriar Hotel (source).

Bouvier and Kennedy were married on September 12, 1953, at St. Mary’s Church in Newport, Rhode Island, in a Mass celebrated by Boston’s Archbishop Richard Cushing. The wedding was considered the social event of the season with an estimated 700 guests at the ceremony and 1,200 at the reception that followed at Hammersmith Farm. The wedding dress, now housed in the Kennedy Library in Boston, Massachusetts, and the dresses of her attendants were created by designer Ann Lowe of New York City.

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Lisa Larsen, Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy, September 1953 via

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Lisa Larsen, Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy, September 1953 via

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Lisa Larsen, Wedding of Jackie Bouvier & John F. Kennedy, September 1953 via

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Lisa Larsen, John and Jacqueline Kennedy at Their Wedding Reception, September 1953 via

Beautiful Vintage Photos of 1920s Paris by André Kertész

André Kertész (1894 – 1985), born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay.

In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition.

Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.

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André Kertész, “Latin Quarter,” Paris, 1926 via

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André Kertész – A Window on the Quai Voltaire, Paris, 1928 via

 

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André Kertész ”Carnival, Paris (woman reading behind stage)” 1926 Gelatin silver print 10 3/4 x 13 inches © Courtesy Estate of André Kertész/Higher Pictures 2007 via

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André Kertész, My Friends at Cafe du Dome, 1928 via

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André Kertész Untitled (La fontaine de la Place de la Concorde), Paris, 1925 via

The “Ostentatious” Photos of Evita Perón in Life Magazine (1950)

In 1950 Gisèle Freund´s photocoverage of a bejewelled Eva Peron for Life Magazine caused a diplomatic stir between the United States and Argentina and upset many of Peron’s supporters—the ostentatious photographs went against the official party line of austerity; Life Magazine was blacklisted in Argentina, Freund had to escape the country with her negatives.

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Evita Perón, on national holiday, Buenos Aires, 1950
Black-and-white photograph; Fiber Base Silver Gelatine Print; white outline border

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Evita Perón, preparing for National Holiday, Buenos Aires, 1950
Black-and-white photograph; Fiber Base Silver Gelatine Print; white outline border

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Evita Perón, plays with her two poodles, Buenos Aires, 1950
Black-and-white photograph; Fiber Base Silver Gelatine Print; white outlin

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Evita Perón, shows her hat collection, Buenos Aires, 1950
Black-and-white photograph; Fiber Base Silver Gelatine Print; white outline border.

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Beatiful Photos of Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund (1950s)

Gisèle Freund (1908 –  2000) was a German-born French photographer and photojournalist, famous for her documentary photography and portraits of writers and artists.

In 1950 Freund´s photocoverage of a bejewelled Eva Peron for Life Magazine caused a diplomatic stir between the United States and Argentina —  the ostentatious photographs went against the official party line of austerity. Life Magazine was blacklisted in Argentina and Freund had to escape the country.

Freund embarked on a two-week trip to Mexico, but she wouldn’t leave until two years later. There she met the legendary couple Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Welcomed into their home, she immersed herself in their private lives and the cultural and artistic diversity of the country, taking hundreds of photographs (source).

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund, 1950 / 1952

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Amazing Portraits of Writers and Artists by Gisèle Freund

Gisèle Freund (1908  – 2000) was a German-born French photographer and photojournalist, famous for her documentary photography and portraits of writers and artists. Her best-known book is Photographie et société (1974) about the uses and abuses of the photographic medium in the age of technological reproduction. In 1977, she became President of the French Association of Photographers, and in 1981, she took the official portrait of French President François Mitterrand.

She was made Officier des Arts et Lettres in 1982 and Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur, the highest decoration in France, in 1983. In 1991, she became the first photographer to be honored with a retrospective at the Musée National d’art Moderne in Paris (Centre Georges Pompidou).

Freund’s major contributions to photography include using the Leica (with its 36 frames) for documentary reportage and her early experimentation with Kodachrome and 35 mm Agfacolor, which allowed her to develop a “uniquely candid portraiture style” that distinguishes her in 20th century photography.

She is buried at the Montparnasse Cemetery in Paris, France near her home and studio at 12 rue Lalande.

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Anouk Aimée by Gisèle Freund (1962)

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Colette by Gisèle Freund (1954)

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Frida Kahlo by Gisèle Freund

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Simone de Beauvoir by Gisèle Freund

(The day of the Prix Goncourt, next to a window writing, Paris, 1954)

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Zsa Zsa Gabor (1953)

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Evita Perón, doing her hair (Reportage for Life magazine, 1950) © Gisèle Freund

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Gisèle Freund, Self-Portrait

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Monroe Photographs: Eve Arnold & Marilyn visit Bement (1950s)

Eve Arnold, OBE, Hon. FRPS (née Cohen; 1912 – 2012) was an American photojournalist. She joined Magnum Photosagency in 1951, and became a full member in 1957.

Eve Arnold photographed many of the iconic figures who shaped the second half of the twentieth century, yet she was equally comfortable documenting the lives of the poor and dispossessed, “migrant workers, civil-rights protestors of apartheid in South Africa, disabled Vietnam war veterans and Mongolian herdsmen.” For Arnold, there was no dichotomy: “”I don’t see anybody as either ordinary or extraordinary,” she said in a 1990 BBC interview, “I see them simply as people in front of my lens.” She also photographed Queen Elizabeth II, Malcolm X, and Joan Crawford, and traveled around the world, photographing in China, Russia, South Africa and Afghanistan

Arnold’s images of Marilyn Monroe on the set of The Misfits (1961) were perhaps her most memorable, but she had taken many photos of Monroe from 1951 onwards. She said about photographing Marilyn:

I found myself in the privileged position of photographing somebody who I had first thought had a gift for the camera, but who turned out had a genius for it. She had a naive quality, but she also had a great sense of showmanship and self-promotion. She was very clever. She was able to assess each photographer. Even if it was only an amateur with a box camera, she worked with the same intensity and diligence that she would have if she were working with a top professional. She would photograph ten pounds lighter which is against every rule in the book. The smile was brilliant. Her skin was translucent, white, luminous. She was always sort of golden-looking, and because she had a down of just very fine golden hairs on her face it trapped the light and caused an aureole to form, giving her a faint glow. It was extraordinary. I’ve never seen it before. It was a nimbus, so that she looked almost angelic.

Arnold left the United States and moved permanently to England in the early 1960s with her son, Frank Arnold. While working for the London Sunday Times, she began to make serious use of colour photography. Her previously unseen photos of Monroe were shown at an Halcyon Gallery exhibition in London during May 2005.

Photographs by Eve Arnold, 1955

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