A Collection of Portraits by Boston Studio “Southworth & Hawes” (1850s)

American photographic studio Southworth & Hawes was established in Boston, Massachusetts in 1843 when Albert Sands Southworth, a druggist, and Josiah Johnson Hawes, a painter, joined together to open a daguerreotype studio. Though portraits were the bulk of the firm’s production, they also produced landscape views.

From 1849 to 1851 Southworth left the studio to travel to California. He returned in 1851 and renewed the partnership with Hawes.

In 1853 Hawes purchased the rights to John Adams Whipple’s process for making paper prints called crystalotypes and the firm began to produce them.

In 1861 the partnership was dissolved. Both Southworth and Hawes continued to operate separate studios in Boston, Massachusetts.

Southworth_and_Hawes_-_Unbekannte_Frau_(1)_(Zeno_Fotografie)

Unknown woman by Southworth and Hawes, ca. 1850s via

Southworth_and_Hawes_-_Unbekannte_Frau_(11)_(Zeno_Fotografie)

Unknown woman by Southworth and Hawes, ca. 1850s via

Miss_Hodges_of_Salem_MET_37.14.20

Miss Hodges of Salem, MET, 1850 via

Lola_Montez_by_Southworth_&_Hawes

Lola Montez by Southworth & Hawes, 1851 via

Albert_Sands_Southworth_and_Josiah_Johnson_Hawes_-_The_Letter_-_Google_Art_Project

The Letter by Southworth & Hawes, ca. 1850 via

Southworth_and_Hawes_-_Unbekannte_Braut_(Zeno_Fotografie)

Unknown bride by Southworth and Hawes, ca. 1850s via

Albert_Sands_Southworth_-_Untitled_-_Google_Art_Project

Albert Sands Southworth – Untitled, ca. 1851 – 1854 via

A Collection of Victorian Era Photos by Roger Fenton (1850s)

Lady_on_Horseback-_MET_DP206643

Roger Fenton, Lady on Horseback, MET, 1850s via

roger_fenton_english_-_the_billiard_room_mentmore_-_google_art_project.jpg

The Billiard Room, Mentmore by Roger Fenton, 1858 via

800px-Bolton_Abbey_by_Roger_Fenton,_1850s

Bolton Abbey by Roger Fenton, 1850s via

wharfe_and_pool_below_the_strid_met_dp107961-e1570962905847.jpg

Wharfe and Pool, Below the Strid, MET, by Roger Fenton, 1854 via

Albertand_Victoria

Queen Victoria and Prince Albert by Roger Fenton, 1854 via

Queen_Victoria_and_Prince_Albert_1854

Queen Victoria and Prince Albert by Roger Fenton, 1854 via

Alice_e_victoria_em_osborn

Victoria, Princess Royal and her sister Princess Alice by Roger Fenton, 1855 via

A Collection of Photographs by Pioneer John Dillwyn Llewelyn (1950s)

John Dillwyn Llewelyn (1810 – 1882) was a botanist and pioneer photographer. He was born in the parish of Llangyfelach, Swansea, Wales, the eldest son of Lewis Weston Dillwyn and Mary Dillwyn, née Adams, the natural daughter of Col. John Llewelyn of Penllergaer and Ynysygerwn. His sister, Mary Dillwyn (1816–1906), is remembered as the earliest female photographer in Wales. Upon coming of age he inherited his maternal grandfather John Llewelyn’s estates of Penllergaer and Ynysygerwn, near Swansea, and assumed the additional surname of Llewelyn

JDL-Penllegare

Collodion glass negative showing the south front of Penllergare House by John Dillwyn Llewelyn, 1858

JDL-picnic

This photographs shows the Llewelyn children having a picnic on the Goppa near Swansea in 1855. It is one of a series of photographs of the children taken by John on the 23rd September each year for his wife’s birthday via

large

Collodion glass negative showing John Dillwyn Llewelyn seated in the conservatory at Penllergare via

john-dillwyn-llewelyn-19th-century-photographer-02

Remember, remember the 5th of November! Photo by John Dillwyn Llewelyn via

A Collection of Horst P. Horst Classics (1930s)

Horst P. Horst (1906 – 1999) was a German-American fashion photographer. His first exhibition took place at La Plume d’Or in Paris in 1932. It was reviewed by Janet Flanner in The New Yorker, and this review, which appeared after the exhibition ended, made Horst instantly prominent.

Horst made a portrait of Bette Davis the same year, the first in a series of public figures he would photograph during his career. Within two years, he had photographed Noël Coward, Yvonne Printemps, Lisa Fonssagrives, Count Luchino Visconti di Madrone, Duke Fulco di Verdura, Baron Nicolas de Gunzburg, Princess Natalia Pavlovna Paley, Daisy Fellowes, Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark, Cole Porter, Elsa Schiaparelli, and others like Eve Curie.

Horst rented an apartment in New York City in 1937, and while residing there met Coco Chanel, whom Horst called “the queen of the whole thing”. He would photograph her fashions for three decades.

mainbocher_master

Horst P. Horst, Mainbocher Corset, 1939 via

lisa_with_harp_master

Horst P. Horst Classics, Lisa with Harp, 1939 via

chanel_master

Horst P. Horst Classics, Coco Chanel, Paris, 1937 via

Classic_Still_Life_master

Horst P. Horst Classics, Still Life, 1937 via