Stylish Bettina In Fath: Photos by Willy Maywald (1950s)

German photographer Wilhelm (Willy) Maywald (1907 – 1985) photographed for various fashion designers and his images were recognized internationally.

Maywald was known for photographing in unique scenes. He was one of the first fashion photographers to photograph his subjects in the streets of Paris. He had a way of photographing his subjects in these various places but the image still focused on the model/clothing. Although Maywald was the main photographer for Dior, he also photographed for several other fashion designers at the time, such as Jacques Fath.

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Bettina Graziani wearring Jacques Fath, photographed by Willy Maywald, 1950 via

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Bettina Graziani wearring Jacques Fath, photographed by Willy Maywald, 1950 via

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Bettina Graziani wearring Jacques Fath, photographed by Willy Maywald, 1950 via

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Bettina Graziani wearring Jacques Fath, photographed by Willy Maywald, 1950 via

The Bois de Boulogne by Jacques-Henri Lartigue (1911)

Jacques Henri Lartigue (1894 – 1986) was a French photographer and painter, known for his photographs of automobile races, planes and female Parisian fashion models

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Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Avenue du Bois de Boulogne, Paris, 1911 via

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Jacques Henri Lartigue, Avenue du Bois de Boulogne, Paris, 1911 via

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Jacques Henri Lartigue, Bois de Boulogne, 1911 © Ministère de la Culture – France / AAJHL via

Princess Clara Ward Postcard

Clara Ward (1873 – 1916) was a wealthy American socialite who married a prince from Belgium. Her main talents were being beautiful by the standards of the time, and being famous. She combined the two by posing on various stages, including at least the Folies Bergère and probably also the Moulin Rouge, while wearing skin-tight costumes.

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Postcard of theater star Clara Ward, ca. 1900s via

A Collection Old Paris Photos by Eugène Atget

Eugène Atget (1857 – 1927) was a French flâneur and a pioneer of documentary photography, noted for his determination to document all of the architecture and street scenes of Paris before their disappearance to modernization. Most of his photographs were first published by Berenice Abbott after his death. An inspiration for the surrealists and other artists, his genius was only recognized by a handful of young artists in the last two years of his life, and he did not live to see the wide acclaim his work would eventually receive.

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Carrousel (MET), Eugène Atget, 1923, printed 1956 via

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St. Cloud (MET), Eugène Atget, 1915–19, printed 1956

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Eclipse (MET), Eugène Atget, 1911, printed 1956 via

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Pompe Funebre (1e Classe/MET), Eugène Atget, 1910, printed 1956 via

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Bar de Cabaret (MET), Eugène Atget, 1900–1911, printed 1956 via

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Rue St. Rustique, Montmartre (MET), Eugène Atget, 1922, printed 1956 via

Amazing French Fashion Photography by Georges Dambier

Georges Dambier was born in 1925 and was one of the first fashion photographers to take models out of the studio and into the streets. While he was still building and perfecting his craft, Dambier was hired by Helene Lazareff, director of ELLE, the fashion magazine, who encouraged him and gave him his first assignment as a fashion photographer.

During his career Dambier photographed amongst others: Rita Hayworth, Gene Tierney, Errol Flynn, Jeanne Moreau, Jean Cocteau, ou Colette, mais aussi Bettina, Capucine and Suzy Parker.

Georges Dambier did not conform to the standard technique of taking fashion pictures, with models standing emotionless and seemingly indifferent to the camera. Instead, he showed models smiling, laughing and often in action. His models were surrounded by local people in a market place in Marrakech, or in a village in Corsica, or – and above all – in his beloved Paris. 

Capucine for ELLE, Boulevard de la Madeleine, Paris, Georges Dambier, 1952 via

Suzy Parker by Georges Dambier via

Suzy Parker Shop Lanvin, Elle, Georges Dambier, 1952 via

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Sophie Litvak and little dog, Elle, 1952 via

“Boulevard du Temple” by Louis Daguerre (1838)

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“Boulevard du Temple”, taken by Louis Daguerre in 1838 in Paris, includes the earliest known candid photograph of a person. The image shows a busy street, but because the exposure had to continue for several minutes the moving traffic is not visible. At the lower left, however, a man apparently having his boots polished, and the bootblack polishing them, were motionless enough for their images to be captured via