Amazing Party Photos From the 1920s

SO THIS IS PARIS

Lilyan Tashman is the center of attention at the wild party exuberantly staged by Ernst Lubitsch in “So This Is Paris,” screening March 12 at Film Forum, 1926 via

impersparty

The Bright Young Things, Impersonation Party, 1927: Among the revellers are Cecil Beaton (back left), Tallulah Bankhead (front right), Elizabeth Ponsonby (in black hat), and (front row left) Stephen Tennant as Queen Marie of Romania via

1920s  Party

 1920s party via

party

Andre Kertesz-A Picnic Party in Bois e Boulogne, Paris, 1929 via

Party time

Party girls, 1928 via

1920s party via

Advertisements

“Boulevard du Temple” by Louis Daguerre (1838)

Boulevard_du_Temple_by_Daguerre

“Boulevard du Temple”, taken by Louis Daguerre in 1838 in Paris, includes the earliest known candid photograph of a person. The image shows a busy street, but because the exposure had to continue for several minutes the moving traffic is not visible. At the lower left, however, a man apparently having his boots polished, and the bootblack polishing them, were motionless enough for their images to be captured via

 

Very Sophisticated Fashion Photography by Georges Dambier

Georges Dambier did not conform to the standard technique of taking fashion pictures, with models standing emotionless and seemingly indifferent to the camera. Instead, he showed models smiling, laughing and often in action. His models were surrounded by local people in a market place in Marrakech, or in a village in Corsica, or – and above all – in his beloved Paris.

18n1838poissonrouge_lo-res

Georges Dambier Marie Helene Arnaud the red fish Magazine Elle 1957 via

17n1848parapluieconcorde_lo-res

Georges Dambier Girl umbrella Concorde Place via

054-jacques-fath-theredlist

Sophie Malgat Litvak in Jacques Fath Coat, photographed by George Dambier for ELLE, 1953 via

086-brigitte-bardot-theredlist

Portrait of Brigitte Bardot by Georges Dambier, 1954 via

16n2081mhamirroir_lo-res

Georges Dambier Marie Helene Arnaud, Antibes Mirror  via

038-jacques-fath-theredlist

Ivy Nicholson in Jacques Fath Dress, photographed by Georges Dambier for Nouveau Femina, 1954 via

Revolutionary Belle Epoque Fashion: Jeanne Margaine-Lacroix

Jeanne Margaine-Lacroix has been neglected by fashion historians. She inherited her couture house from her mother Mme. Margaine, in 1899. The following year she changed the name to Margaine-Lacroix.

She influenced the new slender line of fashion. She was famous for her revolutionary corsetless dresses and her ground-breaking front-lacing corsets. In the 1900s, Paris was the fashion capital of the world. Couturiers routinely sent mannequins to the racecourse, wearing their latest designs. Her models caused a sensation at Longchamp in 1908.

Three mannequins walked onto the racecourse dressed in blue, white and havane brown creations by Margaine-Lacroix. According to newspapers, spectators called the three women a “monstrosity”, accused them of being semi-naked and showing revolting décolletage .

However, soon women everywhere were wearing dresses after Margaine-Lacroix’s design.

jeanne-margaine-lacroix

In the Spring of 1908, three women walked onto the Longchamp racecourse in Paris and caused a scandal by the semi-naked clothes they were wearing via

19010x

Longchamp racecourse, Paris 1908 via

dd6c2dd5f7e80a918cd787641b002508

Tanagréenne back drape on Sylphide dress by Jeanne Margaine-Lacroix. Here is an example of her slender, corsetless line, the robe-tanagréenne. It is worn by her favourite model, who small bust and simple hairstyle were avant-garde for the time and contrasted strongly with the generally accepted ideals of fashionable feminine beauty in the first decade of the twentieth-century, 1908 via

045e8096c31bd29b08ec0672badf3cd2

Sylphide dress with Tanagréenne back drape by Jeanne Margaine-Lacroix, 1908 via

1910

Margaine-Lacroix mannequins pictured in the Parc de Vincennes in March 1910, wearing the new jupe-culotte – an early version of trousers via

m-la

March 1910. Margaine-Lacroix mannequins in the new jupe-culotte via