Iconic 1960s Model Jean Shrimpton in New York by David Bailey (1962)

Jean Shrimpton’s (1942) was a fashion model and icon of Swinging London. Her  career rose to prominence through her work with photographer David Bailey.

Of Jean Shrimpton, Bailey said:

She was magic and the camera loved her too. In a way she was the cheapest model in the world – you only needed to shoot half a roll of film and then you had it. She had the knack of having her hand in the right place, she knew where the light was, she was just a natural.

Shrimpton’s first photo session with Bailey was in 1960 (either for Condé Nast’s Brides on 7 December 1960 or for British Vogue). She started to become known in the modelling world around the time she was working with Bailey.

Shrimpton has stated she owed Bailey her career, and he is often credited for discovering her and being influential in her career.

In turn, she was Bailey’s muse, and his photographs of her helped him rise to prominence in his early career.

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962 via

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962 via

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962 via

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962 via

Dovima and the Leopard by Richard Avedon (1950)

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Richard Avedon, Dovima wearing a Leopard fur coat by Bernham-Stein, 1950 via

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Richard Avedon, Dovima, Harper’s Bazaar, 1950 via

1950s Supermodel Bettina in Jacques Fath

Simone Micheline Bodin (1925-2015), known professionally as Bettina or Bettina Graziani, became one of the century’s first supermodels, rivalled in the forties only by the “English beauty” Barbara Goalen. Before becoming a model she was described as:

“…a freckle-faced rail worker’s daughter from Brittany”

She was renamed and recreated by Jacques Fath, who told her:

“We already have a Simone; you look to me like a Bettina”

Bettina was invited by Christian Dior to join his fashion house which she refused, choosing instead to work for Fath.

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Jacques Fath in studio with Bettina Graziani, 1950 via

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Bettina Graziani in Jacques Fath Dress, 1949 via

Marisa Berenson in Valentino by Henry Clarke (1968)

Marisa Berenson was born in New York City in 1947. Her maternal grandmother was the fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli. Berenson had risen to prominence in the early 1960s and would later appear on the cover of the July 1970 issue of Vogue and in numerous fashion layouts for the magazine. Yves Saint Laurent once dubbed her “the girl of the Seventies”.

Eventually she was cast in several prominent film roles amongst others the Jewish department store heiress Natalia Landauer in the 1972 film Cabaret, for which she received some acclaim (including two Golden Globe nominations, a BAFTAnomination and an award from the National Board of Review).

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American actress and model Marisa Berenson wearing a white organdy Valentino dress photographed by Vogue photographer Henry Clarke, in Cy Twombly’s Rome apartment in 1968 via

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American actress and model Marisa Berenson wearing a white organdy Valentino dress photographed by Vogue photographer Henry Clarke, in Cy Twombly’s Rome apartment in 1968 via

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American actress and model Marisa Berenson wearing a white organdy Valentino dress photographed by Vogue photographer Henry Clarke, in Cy Twombly’s Rome apartment in 1968 via

Twiggy Wearing 1960s Street Fashion

Twiggy is best remembered as one of the first international supermodels and a fashion icon of the 1960s. The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 2009 catalogue of Style: Model as Muse Embodying Fashion stated that:

“Twiggy’s adolescent physique was the perfect frame for the androgynous styles that began to emerge in the 1960s. The trend was manifested in a number of templates: sweet A-line dresses with collars and neckties, suits and dresses that took their details from military uniforms, or, in the case of Yves Saint Laurent, an explicit transposition of the male tuxedo to women. Simultaneously, under the rubric of ‘unisex’, designs that were minimalistic, including Nehru suits and space-agey jumpsuits, were proposed by designers such as Pierre Cardin and Andre Courreges, and, most famously in the U.S.A., by Rudi Gernreich.”

Twiggy has been photographed by such noted photographers as Cecil Beaton, Richard Avedon, Melvin Sokolsky, Ronald Traeger, Bert Stern, Norman Parkinson, Annie Leibovitz and Steven Meisel.

by Lewis Morley, bromide fibre print, 1965

Twiggy by Lewis Morley, bromide fibre print, 1965 via

by Lewis Morley, toned bromide print, 1965

Twiggy by Lewis Morley, bromide fibre print, 1965 via

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Twiggy by Jim Gray, 1960 via

A Collection of Vintage Photos Featuring Anne Gunning

Anne Gunning (1929-1990) started modeling in Ireland in 1953. First photographed by photographer Milton Greene, she went on to be photographed by the greatest photographers of the day. She gained global recognition after being featured on the cover of Life magazine in 1953.

Gunning limited herself to photographic modelling, despite requests from designers like Coco Chanel to be a part of their stage shows. She did only one fashion show – for Sybil Connolly – as a favour. She was afraid of falling down on the stage, and remarked:

“that sea of faces glaring at me was too daunting.”

She worked in Paris, New York and London. She and fellow model Barbara Mullen even accompanied Norrman Parkinson to India, on an assignment for Vogue.

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Ann Gunning, Paris Collections, for Vogue, August 1952 via

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Anne Gunning for Cartier Jewellery, 1952 via

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Anne Gunning in dress by Christian Dior for Vogue UK. Photo by Norman Parkinson, 1952 via

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Anne Gunning in crinolines, Ireland. Photo by Milton Greene, 1953 via

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Anne Gunning wearing Dior, 1954 via

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Anne Gunning in front of Nandi, the Sacred Bull, on Chamundi Hill above Mysore City. Skirt and blouse by Christian Dior, India, Vogue. Photo by Norman Parkinson, 1956 via

Vintage Photos of Glamorous 1950s Model Suzy Parker

When modeling agent Eileen Ford met the model Dorian Leigh’s fifteen-year-old redhead sister, in 1948, she ‘almost fainted with delight’. Suzy Parker became a prominent model of her times who, with her high dimpled cheeks, short flame hair and dark blue eyes, captured the attention of the most famous photographers such as Richard Avedon who believed ‘she was something else – a redheaded force of nature, a wolf in chic clothing, the one flesh-and-blood woman in a world of exquisite creatures’ (source).

Her modeling career reached its zenith during the 1950s. She appeared on the cover of dozens of magazines and in advertisements and starred in movie and television roles.

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Suzy Parker in Harpers Bazaar, wearing a little feathery hat. Photograph by Richard Avedon via

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 Suzy Parker for Mauboussin. Photograph by Henry Clarke, 1953 via

Suzy Parker by Bassman

Suzy Parker 1955 in Lillian Bassman’s photograph The V‐Back Evenings. Lillian Bassman/Harper’s Bazaar via

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Suzy Parker, Etole Leopard, Paris. Photograph by Georges Dambier, 1952 via

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Suzy Parker wears Dior Haute Couture. American Vogue. Photograph by Horst P. Horst, 1952 via

Vintage Photos of the First “Supermodel” Marion Morehouse (1920s)

Marion Morehouse (1906-1969), was a fashion model who rose to prominance in the late 20s and early 30s, sitting for Vanity Fair and Vogue photographer Edward Steichen. The pair created some strikingly modernist photographs. According to Steichen Morehouse was:

The greatest fashion model I ever photographed …. When she put on the clothes that were to be photographed, she transformed herself into a woman who really would wear that gown … whatever the outfit was.

She was also a favorite of Cecil Beaton and French Vogue‘s Baron George Hoyningen-Huene. Morehouse was of Choctaw Indian ancestry, with brown eyes and an angular frame  After her modeling career ended, she took up photography herself.

Later she became the third wife of author and painter E.E Cummings. When Cummings met Marion Morehouse in 1932, he was in the middle of a painful split from his second wife, Anne Barton. Although it is not clear whether the two were ever formally married, Morehouse lived with Cummings in a common-law marriage until his death in 1962. Morehouse died on May 18, 1969, while living at 4 Patchin Place, Greenwich Village, New York City, where Cummings had resided since September 8, 1924

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Marion Morehouse in a Chanel ‘mermaid’ dress, 1929,

by Edward Steichen

Marion Morehouse, in the apartment of Conde Nast, wearing a beaded

white chiffon dress by Chanel, and ankle-strap shoes by Delman, 1927,

photo by Edward Steichen

ca. 1926, Marion Morehouse in back view, wearing a moire gown

with a plunging back and a huge bow; designed by Louiseboulanger

Image by © Condé Nast Archive/CORBIS

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Lee Miller; Marion Morehouse, bromide print, 1929

by Cecil Beaton © Condé Nast via  National Portrait Gallery

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Edward Steichen, Marion Morehouse wearing Cheruit, 1928

© Condé Nast Archive/Corbis.

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Edward Steichen, Marion Morehouse, wearing sequined dress by Cheruit, 1927

© Condé Nast Archive/Corbis.

Richard Avedon & His Amazing Stylish Muse Dovima

Dovima (1927-1990) was reputed to be the highest-paid model of her time. Richard Avedon (1923 – 2004) was an American fashion and portrait photographer. An obituary published in The New York Times said that:

“his fashion and portrait photographs helped define America’s image of style, beauty and culture for the last half-century”

Dovima was the muse of Richard Avedon who depicted her, in a legendary photograph posing in a Christian Dior evening dress with elephants from the Cirque d’Hiver, Paris, in 1955.

In 2010, a record price of £719,000 was achieved at Christie’s for a unique seven-foot-high print of the photo. This particular print, the largest of this image, was made in 1978 for Avedon’s fashion retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and was bought by Maison Christian Dior.

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Richard Avedon, Dovima with elephants,

evening dress by Christian Dior, Cirque d Hiver, August 1955 via

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Richard Avedon, Dovima with elephants,

evening dress by Christian Dior, Cirque d’Hiver, August 1955 via

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Dovima, dress by Claire McCardell, Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt, January 1951 via

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Richard Avedon, Dovima dress by Claire McCardell, Egypt, January 1952 via

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Richard Avedon, Dovima, evening dress by Jacques Fath, Paris, August 1950 via