Brigitte Bardot Dressed in Vintage Balmain for “The Bride Is Much Too Beautiful” (1956)

The Bride is Much Too Beautiful is a 1956 French comedy film directed by Pierre Gaspard-Huit.

It was also known as Her Bridal Night and La mariée est trop belle.

The wedding dress that Bardot wears in the film is by French designer Pierre Balmain.

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Brigitte Bardot in The Bride Is Much Too Beautiful directed by Pierre Gaspard-Huit, 1956. Dress by Pierre Balmain via

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Brigitte Bardot in The Bride Is Much Too Beautiful directed by Pierre Gaspard-Huit, 1956. Dress by Pierre Balmain via

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Brigitte Bardot in The Bride Is Much Too Beautiful directed by Pierre Gaspard-Huit, 1958. Dress by Pierre Balmain via

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Brigitte Bardot in The Bride Is Much Too Beautiful directed by Pierre Gaspard-Huit, 1956  via

 

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Two Portraits of Romy Schneider on the Set of Sissi (1957)

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Portrait of Romy Schneider on the set of Sissi – Schicksalsjahre einer Kaiserin/ Face à son destin, directed by Ernest Marischka, 1957. Photo by F.C. Gundlach via

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Portrait of Romy Schneider on the set of Sissi – Schicksalsjahre einer Kaiserin/ Face à son destin, directed by Ernest Marischka, 1957. Photo by F.C. Gundlach via

Maria’s Wedding Dress: Julie Andrews in The Sound of Music (1965)

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The Wedding Dress from The Sound of Music  via

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The Wedding Dress from The Sound of Music via

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The Wedding Dress from The Sound of Music via

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The Wedding Dress from The Sound of Music  via

Elegant Vintage Fashion Photos: 1950s Veiled Hats

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Irving Penn, Model Jean Patchett in black and white hat with veil, scarf and top, Vogue, 1950 via

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Jacques Fath, Hat with Veil, photographed by Willy Maywald, 1951 via

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Jacques Fath, Hat with Veil, photographed by Willy Maywald, 1951

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Lillian Marcuson in Lily Dache hat, photo by Milton Greene, 1951 via

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Mary Jane Russell photo by Larry Gordon, 1952 via

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Ivy Nicholson © Room wearing Givenchy’s stiff-veiled circlet, Photo Nat Farbman, 1952 via

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Bettina Graziani Photo by Georges Dambier via

Brigitte Bardot and Roger Vadim’s wedding (1952)

On 21 December 1952, aged 18, Brigitte Bardot married director Roger Vadim in Paris. The couple met after the bourgeois Bardot appeared on the cover of a magazine and the director Marc Allégret, who Vadim was assisting, invited her to do a screen test. When her family forbade the teen from seeing the much older Vadim, she attempted suicide.

In the sixties, Bardot paved the way for the off-the-rack, no-fuss, leg-exposing bride. On her weddding to Vadim she wore a high-collared, bustled dress accessorized with muff and veil. According to the groom:

“Brigitte designed and chose the material for the white, handsewn wedding dress from Madame Ogive, the dressmaker on the Rue de Passy.” (source)

The couple divorced in 1957, but remained friends and collaborated in later work.

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Brigitte Bardot and Roger Vadim’s wedding, 1952 via

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Brigitte Bardot and Roger Vadim’s wedding, 1952 via

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Brigitte Bardot and Roger Vadim’s wedding, 1952 via

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Brigitte Bardot and Roger Vadim’s wedding, 1952 via

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Brigitte Bardot and Roger Vadim’s wedding, 1952 via

 

The Royal Bridal Gown of Queen Elizabeth (nee Bowes Lyon), 1923

Prince Albert, Duke of York, and Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon were married on 26 April 1923 in Westminster Abbey. Elizabeth’s wedding dress was made from deep ivory chiffon moire, embroidered with pearls and a silver thread. It was intended to match the traditional Flanders lace provided for the train by Queen Mary. Elizabeth’s dress, which was in the fashion of the early 1920s, was designed by Madame Handley-Seymour, dressmaker to Queen Mary.

A strip of Brussels lace, inserted in the dress, was a Strathmore family heirloom. A female ancestor of the bride wore it to a grand ball for “Bonnie Prince Charlie”, Charles Edward Stuart.

The silver leaf girdle had a trail of spring green tulle, trailing to the ground; silver and rose thistle fastened it. According to an era news article:

“In the trimming the bride has defied all old superstitions about the unluckiness of green.”

Unlike more recent dresses, details of this one were publicly revealed in advance of the wedding day. However, the dress was worked on until the last possible opportunity: the day before the wedding, Elizabeth divided her time between the wedding rehearsal and her dressmakers.

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Queen Elizabeth (nee Bowes Lyon) wearing her long bridal veil of old point de Flanderes lace (1923) via

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Queen Elizabeth (nee Bowes Lyon) in her wedding dress (1923) via

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Queen Elizabeth (nee Bowes Lyon) & Prince Albert wearing RAF full dress in the rank of group captain, his senior service rank at the time of his marriage (1923) via

Bille Dove – The American Beauty

Billie Dove (1903-1997) was in her heyday known for her voluptuous femininity on the silent screen, rivaled that of Mary Pickford, Marion Davies and Clara Bow in popularity. She retired after only a few years into the talking picture era, however, and is not as well-remembered in today’s film circles as the aforementioned.

She was born Bertha Bohny to Swiss immigrant parents. As a teen, she worked as a model to help support her family and was hired as a teenager by Florenz “Flo” Ziegfeld to appear in his Ziegfeld Follies Revue.

However, a burgeoning affair between Dove and Ziegfeld prompted Ziegfeld’s wife Billie Burke to arrange work out West for the young starlet in Hollywood films. She soon became one of the most popular actresses of the 1920s, appearing in Douglas Fairbanks’ smash hit Technicolor film The Black Pirate (1926), as Rodeo West in The Painted Angel (1929), and was dubbed The American Beauty (1927), the title of one of her films.

She married the director of her seventh film, Irvin Willat, in 1923. The two divorced in 1929. Dove had a huge legion of male fans, one of her most persistent being Howard Hughes. She shared a three-year romance with Hughes and was engaged to marry him, but she ended the relationship without ever giving cause. Hughes cast her as a comedian in his film Cock of the Air (1932). She also appeared in his movie The Age for Love (1931).

Following her last film, Blondie of the Follies (1932), Dove retired from the screen to be with her family, although she was at the time still popular. She married oil executive Robert Kenaston in 1933.

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Billie Dove as a Ziegfield Follies Girl, by Alfred Cheney Johnston

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Billie Dove as a Ziegfield Follies Girl by Alfred Cheney Johnston

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Billie Dove

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Billie-Dove-Bride

Billie Dove as a Bride

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Billie Dove

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Billie Dove

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Billæie Dove in Blondie of the Follies, her last film (1932)

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Billie Dove (Reprise)