Edward Steichen, Foxgloves, France (1926)

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Edward Steichen, Foxgloves, France (1926)

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Schiaparelli’s Perfume, Salut, by Ilse Bing (1934)

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Study for the lily-scented perfume ‘Salut de Schiaparelli’ by Ilse Bing (1934)

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Advertising shot for the lily-scented perfume ‘Salut de Schiaparelli’ by Ilse Bing (1934)

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Theda Bara in Silent Film Sin (1915)

Theda Bara made over 40 films for the Fox Film Corporation, with titles like The Eternal Sin, The Blue Flame, The Soul of Buddha, Purgatory’s Ivory Angel & Carmen.

In 1915 Fox produced silent drama Sin with Theda Bara starring  as Rose.

In order to play up Theda Bara’s image as a vamp, Fox Film Corporation publicized the film with the tagline “Sin With Theda Bara!”. Upon its release, Sin was an enormous hit with audiences and Bara earned generally good reviews for her performance.

In spite of its success, the film was banned in Ohio and Georgia due to its themes of suicide, lust, Roman Catholic sacrilege and love triangles. The Pittsburgh Board of Welfare condemned the film as did the Kansas Board of Censorship (which apparently still allowed the film to run in Kansas theaters).

The film is now considered to be lost.

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Theda Bara as Rosa in Sin (1915)

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Theda Bara as Rosa in Sin (1915)

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Theda Bara as Rosa in Sin (1915)

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Theda Bara as Rosa in Sin (1915)

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Photos of Eva Palmer-Sikelianos

Evelina “Eva” Palmer-Sikelianos (1874 – 1952) was an American woman notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music. Palmer’s life and artistic endeavors intersected with numerous noteworthy artists throughout her life.

She was both inspired by or inspired the likes of dancers Isadora Duncan and Ted Shawn, the French literary great Colette, the poet and author Natalie Barney and the actress Sarah Bernhardt.

She would go on to marry Angelos Sikelianos, a Greek poet and playwright. Together they organized a revival of the Delphic Festival in Delphi, Greece. Embodied in these festivals of art, music and theater she hoped to promote a balanced sense of enlightenment that would further the goals of peace and harmony in Greece and beyond.

 

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Eva Palmer-Sikelianos

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Eva Palmer-Sikelianos

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Lillie Langtry (1853-1929) as ‘Cleopatra’ (1895)

circa 1895: Actress Lillie Langtry as Cleopatra. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Circa 1895: Actress Lillie Langtry as Cleopatra.

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Circa 1895: Actress Lillie Langtry as Cleopatra.

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Actress Lillie Langtry as Cleopatra postcard.

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Some Victorian “Carte de Visites”

The carte de visite was a type of small photograph which was patented in Paris by photographer André Adolphe Eugène Disdéri in 1854.  It was a small, cheap portrait format which made photography available to the masses.

It was usually made of an albumen print, which was a thin paper photograph mounted on a thicker paper card.

The Carte de Visite was slow to gain widespread use until 1859, when Disdéri published Emperor Napoleon III’s photos in this format. This made the format an overnight success.

The new invention was so popular it was known as “cardomania”and it spread throughout Europe and then quickly to America and the rest of the world.

The immense popularity of these card photographs led to the publication and collection of photographs of prominent persons.

Each photograph was the size of a visiting card, and such photograph cards were traded among friends and visitors.

Albums for the collection and display of cards became a common fixture in Victorian parlors.

By the early 1870s, cartes de visite were supplanted by “cabinet cards,” which were also usually albumen prints, but larger, mounted on cardboard backs.

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Contemporary carte de visite, 1860s

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Victorian carte de visite circa 1880s

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One of the first cartes de visite of Queen Victoria taken by photographer John Jabez Edwin Mayall

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Napoléon III and his wife Eugenie, cartes de visite by Disderi, circa 1865

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Carte de visite photograph of Ella Wesner, circa 1872, the most celebrated male impersonator of the Gilded Age Vaudeville circuit.

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 1860s original/vintage albumen carte de visite of a lovely young California bride in her flowing white wedding dress taken by the pioneer daguerreotypist from San Francisco,William Shew.

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