Wonderful Belle Epoque Photos of Can-Can Dancer Saharet

Saharet (1879-1942) was an Australian dancer who made her New York City debut in February 1897. She performed in vaudeville music houses as well as in Broadway productions. Her given name was Clarissa Rose.

 

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Saharet by Georg Gerlach of Berlin ca. 1905 via

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Saharet by Georg Gerlach of Berlin ca. 1905 via

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Saharet by Georg Gerlach of Berlin ca. 1905 via

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Beautiful Vintage Photos of Rosa Rolanda by Man Ray

Californian born Rosa Rolanda (1895-1970, aka Rosemonde Cowan, Rose Rolando, Mrs or Miguel Covarrubias) was a multidisciplinary artist, dancer and choreographer.

In 1916, Rosa Rolanda began her artistic career in New York as a celebrated dancer in Broadway revues. She became involved with the Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias in 1924, and in the following year the couple traveled to Mexico, where Rolanda began to take photographs.

During the late 1920s or early 1930s, Rolanda experimented with photograms, creating significant series of surrealist self-portraits that may have been influenced by Man Ray, who photographed Rolanda in Paris in 1923.

She probably began painting around 1926. The majority of Rolanda’s canvases depict colorful, folkloric scenes of children and festivals, portraits of friends such as the movie actresses Dolores del Río and María Félix, and self-portraits.

Rolanda and Covarrubias married in 1930, and by 1935 they had permanently settled into his family home in Tizapan El Alto, close to Mexico City.

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Rosa Rolanda by Man Ray, 1928 via

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Rosa Rolanda in Paris c. 1923, photograph by Man Ray via

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Rosa Rolanda by Man Ray 1923 via

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Rosa Rolanda in Paris circa 1923 by Man Ray via

Ann Pennington teaching Felix the Cat how to dance the “Black Bottom”.

The “Black Bottom” refers to a dance which became popular in the 1920s, originating among African Americans in the rural South. It was adopted by mainstream American culture  and became a national craze in the 1920s.

The dance was most famously performed by Ziegfeld Follies star Ann Pennington (1893 – 1971) , who danced the Black Bottom in a Broadway revue put on by Ziegfeld’s rival George White in 1926. The dance was first popularized in New York by the African American show Dinaah that had been staged in Harlem in 1924, after Pennington performed the Black Bottom on Broadway, the dance became a national phenomenon, overtaking The Charleston in popularity.

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Ann Pennington teaches Felix the Cat the Black Bottom (1927) via

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Ann Pennington teaches Felix the Cat the Black Bottom (1927) via

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Ann Pennington teaches Felix the Cat the Black Bottom (1927) via

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Ann Pennington teaches Felix the Cat the Black Bottom (1927) via

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Ann Pennington teaches Felix the Cat the Black Bottom (1927) via

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Ann Pennington teaches Felix the Cat the Black Bottom (1927) via

American Dancer Jean Barry (1930s)

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Dancer Jean Barry, ca. 1931.

Photo by George Hoyningen-Huene

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Dancer Jean Barry, performing in the play Evergreen, 1931.

Photo by George Hoyningen-Huene.

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Dancer Jean Barry, 1931.

Photo by Edward Steichen

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Early Film Dancer Annabelle Moore (1878-1961)

Annabelle Moore (1878 – 1961) was an American dancer and actress who was quite popular in her youth. She appeared in at least nine films beween 1894 and 1897. The films were dance films and included “A Mermaid Dance”, “Butterfly Dance” and “Serpentine Dance”.

The sale of her films was further boosted in December 1896 when it was revealed that she had been approached to appear naked at a private dinner party at Sherry’s Restaurant – It is even said she introduced eroticism in film.

In 1907 Annabelle starred as the Gibson Bathing Girl in the first of  the Ziegfeld Follies.

In 1910 she married Edward James Buchan. He died in 1958 and Annabelle died penniless in Chicago in 1961. In her obituary in the New York Times it was said Annabelle:

“was the symbol of beauty in her day. She was billed as ‘the original Gibson Girl’ because of her striking resemblance to the Charles Dana Gibson portrait.”

Annabelle had a similar appearance to the Gibson Girl.  But as far as Gibson modeling his idealization of the perfect woman on Annabelle, there is little evidence that he did (source).

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Annabelle Moore, 1900s

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Annabelle Moore, 1908

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Annabelle Butterfly Dance (1894)

Leïla Bederkhan – Kurdish Moderne Dancer

Leyla Bedirhan (1903-1986) was born in Istanbul. She was the daughter of a kurdish Prince and his Polish wife. She studied ballet in Germany.

Leïla Bederkhan was the name she preferred to use in Europe. She was the . She performed in Europe and the United States with a modern dance program composed of works inspired by Assyrian and Egyptian dance styles. Intending to highlight the historical roots of her choreography, she put on her performances in authentic locations; and she produced a dance exhibition utilizing the Great Sphynx at Giza in Egypt as a background (source). She died in Paris.

 

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Leïla Bederkhan by Madame d’Ora (Dora Kallmus)

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Leïla Bederkhan by Arnold Genthe

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Leïla Bederkhan

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