Wonderful Portrait of Queen Mary of Teck Prior to Royal Wedding (1893)

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Portrait of Queen Mary (1867–1953) when Princess Victoria Mary of Teck, sitting prior to wedding, 6 July 1893. The Diamond rivière necklace was a gift from King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra in memory of the Duke of Clarence, 27 February, 1892. Photo by James Lafayette via

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Portrait of Queen Mary (1867–1953) when Princess Victoria Mary of Teck, sitting prior to wedding, 6 July 1893. The Diamond rivière necklace was a gift from King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra in memory of the Duke of Clarence, 27 February, 1892. Photo by James Lafayette via

First Public Photo of Queen Victoria (1860)

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Queen Victoria by John Jabez Edwin Mayall in 1860. One of the first published photographs of the Queen. The public had never seen or been able to buy a photograph of the Queen before and once on sale, the images were extremely popular via

Impressive Pioneer Photography by Hill & Adamson (1843 – 1848)

In 1843 artist David Octavius Hill joined engineer Robert Adamson in partnership at Rock House on Calton Hill, Edinburgh, Scotland.

During their brief four year partnership, between 1843-1848, Hill & Adamson produced the first substantial body of self-consciously artistic work using the newly invented medium of photography.

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David Octavius Hill, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848), 1843 via

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Miss Matilda Rigby, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848) via

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The bird-cage, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848)  via

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A Discussion,  Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848), via

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The Letter, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848) via

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Mr Laing or Laine, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848) via

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Piper and Drummer of the 92nd Gordon Highlanders, Edinburgh Castle, Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848) via

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The Scott Monument,  Hill & Adamson (Scottish, active 1843 – 1848), about 1845 via

Whistler´s Brilliant Portraits

James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834 – 1903) was an American artist, active during the American Gilded Age and based primarily in the United Kingdom. He was averse to sentimentality and moral allusion in painting, and was a leading proponent of the credo “art for art’s sake”. His famous signature for his paintings was in the shape of a stylized butterfly possessing a long stinger for a tail. The symbol was apt, for it combined both aspects of his personality—his art was characterized by a subtle delicacy, while his public persona was combative.

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Jo by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1861 via

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Weary by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1863 via

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Reading by Lamplight by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1858 via

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Annie Haden by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1860 via

Count Burckhardt published 1862 by James Abbott McNeill Whistler 1834-1903

Count Burckhardt by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1862 via

 

Late Victorian Fancy Dress: The Devonshire House Ball in 1897

The Devonshire House Costume Ball of 1897 was one of the most anticipated social events of 1897. To stress the importance of th magnificent affair, the London Photographic Firm Lafayette was invited to take studio-style photographs of the guests in their costumes, which ranged from mythical goddesses, figures from paintings, and historical kings and queens.

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The Duke of York, later King George V (1865-1936), as “The Queen’s Champion” and the Duchess of York, later Queen Mary (1867-1953)  as “a Lady at the Court of Marguerite de Valois” at the Devonshire House Fancy Dress Ball 1897.

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Frances Evelyn (Daisy), the countess of Warwick, chose Marie Antoinette as her costume for the elegant and highly anticipated evening. The costume, made by Worth of Paris, was studded with real diamonds and used both gold and antique lace.

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Lady Randolph Churchill (1854-1921), née Jennie Jerome in a Worth Parisian Costume, as Empress Theodora, while attending the Devonshire House Ball, in 1897.

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Consuelo Marlborough (née Vanderbilt), dressed for the Devonshire House Ball in 1897.

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Mary Teresa (‘Daisy’) (Cornwallis-West), Princess of Pless dressed as Queen of Sheba for the Devonshire House Ball

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Miss Goelet as Scheherazade

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The ethereal beauty of Mrs J Graham Menzies in the role of Titania, Queen of the Fairies

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Beautiful Victorian Portraits by Lady Clementina Hawarden

Lady Clementina Hawarden (1822 – 1865) was a noted portrait photographer of the Victorian Era.

She turned to photography in late 1857 or early 1858, whilst living on the estate of her husband’s family in Dundrum, Co. Tipperary, Ireland. A move to London in 1859 allowed her to set up a studio in her elegant home in South Kensington.

The furniture and characteristic decor of an upper-class London home was removed in order to create mise-en-scène images and theatrical poses within the first floor of her home – Hawarden’s characteristic portraits include her daughters Isabella Grace, Clementina, and Florence Elizabeth.

Hawarden produced albumen prints from wet-plate collodion negatives, a method commonly used at the time. Her work was widely acclaimed for its “artistic excellence”. Hawarden was considered an amateur photographer and while appreciated for her work, never became widely known as a photographer. Her photographic years were brief but prolific. Hawarden produced over eight hundred photographs from 1857-1864 before her sudden death. she died after suffering from pneumonia for one week, aged 42. It has been suggested that her immune system was weakened by constant contact with the photographic chemicals.

Her work is likened to Julia Margaret Cameron, another Victorian female photographer.

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A photograph that is possibly a self-portrait of Clementina, Lady Hawarden, taken in about 1862.

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Isabella by Clementina, Lady Hawarden

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Isabella by Lady Clementina Hawarden

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Clementina reading while sitting at the window wearing some kind of fancy dress or theatrical costume, ca. 1862-63 by Lady Clementina Hawarden.

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Clementina, reading a book by Clementina, Lady Hawarden

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Lillie Langtry (1853-1929) as ‘Cleopatra’ (1895)

circa 1895: Actress Lillie Langtry as Cleopatra. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Circa 1895: Actress Lillie Langtry as Cleopatra.

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Circa 1895: Actress Lillie Langtry as Cleopatra.

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Actress Lillie Langtry as Cleopatra postcard.

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