Anna Held by Aimé Dupont (1900)

Helene Anna Held (1872 – 1918), known professionally as Anna Held, was a Broadway stage performer and singer, born in Warsaw, Poland she started her career with stints in theatres in Paris and London, she is most often associated with theatre producer and impresario Florenz Ziegfeld, her common-law husband.

Anna_Held_cph.3b03779

Anna Held, full-length photo, facing right, with right hand on hat and left hand on hip by Aimé Dupont, 1900 via

Anna_Held_I

Anna Held, full-length photo, facing right, with right hand on hat and left hand on hip by Aimé Dupont, 1900 via

Louise of France Princess of Bourbon (1906)

Louise Françoise Marie Laure d’Orléans (1882 – 1958) was a Princess of the Two-Sicilies and maternal grandmother of King Juan Carlos I of Spain. Louise was the youngest daughter of Philippe d’Orléans (1838–1894), Count of Paris and claimant to the French throne as “Philippe VII”. Her mother was Princess Marie Isabelle d’Orléans (1848–1919), daughter of Antoine, Duke of Montpensier, and Infanta Luisa Fernanda of Spain.

On 16 November 1907, Louise married in Wood Norton, Evesham, Worcestershire, UK, Infante Carlos, Prince of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1870–1949), and widower of Mercedes, Princess of Asturias, Infanta of Spain. The couple lived in Madrid and had 4 children.

Louise,_Princess_of_Bourbon-Two_Sicilies

Louise of France Princess of Bourbon, 1906 via

Louise_of_France_Princess_of_Bourbon

Louise of France Princess of Bourbon by Léopold-Émile Reutlinger, 1906 via

Louise_-_Princess_of_Bourbon-Two_Sicilies

Louise of France Princess of Bourbon by Léopold-Émile Reutlinger, 1906 via

Evelyn Nesbit by Otto Sarony (1901)

evelyn-nesbit

Otto Sarony, Portrait of Evelyn Nesbit, 1901 via

034-evelyn

Otto Sarony, Portrait of Evelyn Nesbit, 1901 via

Costumes de Théâtre by Redfern (1908)

costumes_de_theatre_de_redfern

Exposition à l’Hôtel des Modes. Photograph in Les Modes : Revue mensuelle illustrée des arts décoratifs appliqués à la femme, 1908 via

costumes_de_theatre_de_redfern_cropped

Exposition à l’Hôtel des Modes. Photograph in Les Modes : Revue mensuelle illustrée des arts décoratifs appliqués à la femme , 1908 via

Revolutionary Belle Epoque Fashion: Jeanne Margaine-Lacroix

Jeanne Margaine-Lacroix has been neglected by fashion historians. She inherited her couture house from her mother Mme. Margaine, in 1899. The following year she changed the name to Margaine-Lacroix.

She influenced the new slender line of fashion. She was famous for her revolutionary corsetless dresses and her ground-breaking front-lacing corsets. In the 1900s, Paris was the fashion capital of the world. Couturiers routinely sent mannequins to the racecourse, wearing their latest designs. Her models caused a sensation at Longchamp in 1908.

Three mannequins walked onto the racecourse dressed in blue, white and havane brown creations by Margaine-Lacroix. According to newspapers, spectators called the three women a “monstrosity”, accused them of being semi-naked and showing revolting décolletage .

However, soon women everywhere were wearing dresses after Margaine-Lacroix’s design.

jeanne-margaine-lacroix

In the Spring of 1908, three women walked onto the Longchamp racecourse in Paris and caused a scandal by the semi-naked clothes they were wearing via

19010x

Longchamp racecourse, Paris 1908 via

dd6c2dd5f7e80a918cd787641b002508

Tanagréenne back drape on Sylphide dress by Jeanne Margaine-Lacroix. Here is an example of her slender, corsetless line, the robe-tanagréenne. It is worn by her favourite model, who small bust and simple hairstyle were avant-garde for the time and contrasted strongly with the generally accepted ideals of fashionable feminine beauty in the first decade of the twentieth-century, 1908 via

045e8096c31bd29b08ec0672badf3cd2

Sylphide dress with Tanagréenne back drape by Jeanne Margaine-Lacroix, 1908 via

1910

Margaine-Lacroix mannequins pictured in the Parc de Vincennes in March 1910, wearing the new jupe-culotte – an early version of trousers via

m-la

March 1910. Margaine-Lacroix mannequins in the new jupe-culotte via

France, Turn of the Century, by The Seeberger Brothers


Seeberger brothers. 5761213685_e7f8bea0b2_b

By Fréres Seeberger (Jules, Louis et Henri) via

Seeberger brothers. 5761213845_3b40bf3e86_b

By Fréres Seeberger (Jules, Louis et Henri) via

fre

By Fréres Seeberger (Jules, Louis et Henri) via

Seeberger brothers. 5761757158_5d18f3fc37_b

By Fréres Seeberger (Jules, Louis et Henri) via

Seeberger brothers. 66666661

By Fréres Seeberger (Jules, Louis et Henri) via

Early 20th Century Couture by Mariano Fortuny (1871 – 1949)

Spanish-born artist and designer Mariano Fortuny (1871 – 1949) was active in Italy, where he established a textile workshop and a commercial silk printing factory. The multi-tasked artist spent most of his life in Venice where he was an architect, couturier, inventor and painter.

Working in the early 20th century, Fortuny’s gowns were especially popular among the avant garde women of ’20s and ’30s who were seeking both freedom of movement and a hint of exoticism in their wardrobe.

Fortuny rebelled against the style lines that were popular during his time period and created the Delphos gown, a shift dress made of finely pleated silk weighed down by glass beads that held its shape and flowed on the body. The pleating that he used was all done by hand and no one has been able to recreate pleating that is as fine as his or has held its shape like his dresses have for many years. He also manufactured his own dyes and pigments for his fabrics using ancient methods. With these dyes he began printing on velvets and silks and dyed them using a press that he invented with wooden blocks that he engraved the pattern onto. His dresses are seen as fine works of art today and many survive, still pleated, in museums and many people’s personal collections.

FORTUNY_01_resize-550x705

Mrs. William Wetmore Modeling a Delphos Gown, Photograph by Lusha Nelson. Originally published in Vogue, December 15, 1935. via

mariano-fortuny

George Platt Lynes, Mai-Mai Sze, Dress by Mariano Fortuny, 1934 via

mariano-fortuny-

Mariano Fortuny, Delphos Gown, 1920s via

marianofortuny

Mariano Fortuny, Lillian Gish in Delphos Gown, 1910s via

fortuny-e1529834677889.jpg

Countess Elsie Lee Gozzi wearing an Eleanora dress, 1920s via

A Collection of Photos Feat. Belle Epoque Dresses by Jeanne Paquin

Jeanne Paquin (1869 – 1936) was a leading French fashion designer, who created alongside her husband, Isidore Paquin, an influential couture business. In 1890 the couple opened Maison de Couture Rue de la Paix in Paris, close to the celebrated House of Worth.

The Maison Paquin quickly became known for its eighteenth century-inspired pastel evening dresses and tailored day dresses, as well as for its numerous publicity stunts, including organizing fashion parades to promote her new models and sending her models to operas and races in order to show off her designs. Jeanne Paquin withdrew from the House in 1920. She was a beautiful woman and a style icon herself, who imagined youthful and exquisite garments

Robe par Jeanne Paquin, vers 1910

Jeanne Paquin, 1910 via

jeanp1

Jeanne Paquin, 1910 via

jeanp3

Jeanne Paquin. Evening gown. Reutlinger, Les Modes May 1902 via

jeanp4

Jeanne Paquin. Afternoon dress by Paquin. Reutlinger, Les Modes May 1902 via

jeanp5

Jeanne Paquin. Tailored suits by Paquin. Félix, Les Modes June 1909 via