A Collection of Photos Feat. Venice by Francesco Bonaldi & Tarreghetta (1855)

14389_Bonaldi

Francesco Bonaldi & Tarreghetta Saint Mark’s Square, Venice, Italy, 1855 via

14391_Bonaldi

Francesco Bonaldi & Tarreghetta Grand Canal (with Boats), Venice, Italy, 1855 via

14135

Francesco Bonaldi & Tarreghetta Rialto Bridge in Venice, Italy, 1855 via

14136

Tarreghetta Grand Canal, View Towards Giudecca, Venice, Italy, 1855 via

14386_Bonaldi

Francesco Bonaldi & Tarreghetta Pesaro Palace, Venice, Italy, 1855 via

14387_Bonaldi

Francesco Bonaldi & Tarreghetta View from the Grand Canal of the Doges Palace, Venice, Italy, 1855 via

14388_Bonaldi

Francesco Bonaldi & Tarreghetta Gallerie dell’Accademia di Belle Arti of Venice, Italy, 1855 via

Queen Victorias Wedding 10th of February 1840

Queen Victoria first met her German cousin, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, in 1836, and they became engaged during his second visit to England in 1839. Their wedding ceremony took place on 10 February 1840 at the Chapel Royal, St James’s Palace.

Queen Victoria chose to marry Prince Albert in a white silk satin gown featuring Honiton lace, an unusual color choice for bridal gowns at the time; she started the white wedding gown tradition that remains today. On her wedding morning, Queen Victoria wrote in her journal:

Dressed….I wore a white satin gown with a very deep flounce of Honiton, imitation of old. I wore my Turkish diamond necklace and earrings, and Albert’s beautiful sapphire brooch.

She also wore a wreath of orange blossoms (symbolising purity) and myrtle (symbolising love and domestic happiness), and these became the most common flowers carried and worn in Victorian weddings.

Their wedding day itself was inauspicious, a heavy rain falling; but immense multitudes assembled to gaze upon the processions. The bridal procession from Buckingham Palace to St. James’s begun to move through the triumphal arch at 12 o’clock. It was the first wedding of a reigning Queen in England since 1554.

Queen Victoria spent the evening after her wedding lying down with a headache, but wrote ecstatically in her diary:

I NEVER, NEVER spent such an evening!!! MY DEAREST DEAREST DEAR Albert … his excessive love & affection gave me feelings of heavenly love & happiness I never could have hoped to have felt before! He clasped me in his arms, & we kissed each other again & again! His beauty, his sweetness & gentleness – really how can I ever be thankful enough to have such a Husband! … to be called by names of tenderness, I have never yet heard used to me before – was bliss beyond belief! Oh! This was the happiest day of my life!

Her marriage to Prince Albert brought nine children between 1840 and 1857. Most of her children married into other Royal families of Europe.

queen vic wed

Queen Victoria and Prince Albert on their return from the marriage service at St James’s Palace, London, 10th February 1840. Engraved by S Reynolds after F Lock via

QueenVictoria_RoyalWedding

A middle aged Victoria and Albert recreate their wedding day via

Empress Eugénie on a prie-Dieu by Gustave Le Gray (1856)

Doña María Eugenia Ignacia Augustina de Palafox y KirkPatrick, 16th Countess of Teba, 15th Marchioness of Ardales (1826 – 1920), known as Eugénie de Montijo, was the last Empress consort of the French, from 1853 to 1871, as the wife of Napoleon III, Emperor of the French.

limpeeratrice_eugeenie_agenouil79768_0

L’impératrice Eugénie agenouillée sur un prie-Dieu by Le Gray Gustave via

Empress Eugenie

L’impératrice Eugénie agenouillée sur un prie-Dieu dans le salon du palais de Saint-Cloud by Le Gray Gustave via

A Collection Of Portraits by Whistler

James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834 – 1903) was an American artist, active during the American Gilded Age and based primarily in the United Kingdom. He was averse to sentimentality and moral allusion in painting, and was a leading proponent of the credo “art for art’s sake”. His famous signature for his paintings was in the shape of a stylized butterfly possessing a long stinger for a tail. The symbol was apt, for it combined both aspects of his personality—his art was characterized by a subtle delicacy, while his public persona was combative.

whistler3

Jo by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1861 via

83.1.28

Weary by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1863 via

reading

Reading by Lamplight by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1858 via

annie-haden-1860

Annie Haden by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1860 via

Count Burckhardt published 1862 by James Abbott McNeill Whistler 1834-1903

Count Burckhardt by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, 1862 via