Royal Bride Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon Leaving For Westminster Abbey (1923)

The wedding of Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (later Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother) and Prince Albert, Duke of York (later King George VI), took place on 26 April 1923 at Westminster Abbey.

Lady Elizabeth was attended by eight bridesmaids. Her wedding dress was made from deep ivory chiffon moire, embroidered with pearls and a silver thread.

In an unexpected and unprecedented gesture, Elizabeth laid her bouquet at the Tomb of The Unknown Warrior on her way into the Abbey, in memory of her brother Fergus. Ever since, the bouquets of subsequent royal brides have traditionally been laid at the tomb, though after the wedding ceremony rather than before.

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Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923 via

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Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923  via

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Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923 via

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Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon leaves the house in her wedding dress to marry Prince Albert, Duke of York at Westminster Abbey on the 23rd April 1923 via

 

Wedding of Duke of York and Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon at Westminster Abbey London.

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Vintage Photos of Jazz Age Trio “The Brox Sisters”

The Brox Sisters were an American trio of singing sisters, enjoying their greatest popularity in the 1920s and early 1930s. The sisters were: Lorayne (born Eunice 1901 – 1993) Bobbe (born Josephine Brock 1902 – 1999) & Patricia (born Kathleen 1904 – 1988).

The family name “Brock” was changed to “Brox” for theater marquees. The trio grew up in Tennessee and retained Southern accents during their performing careers.

They began in the 1910s touring the Vaudeville circuit in the United States and Canada. At the start of the 1920s they achieved success in New York on the Broadway stage. Near the end of the decade they relocated to Los Angeles.

The act broke up in the early 1930s after the sisters got married. They made their final professional reunion appearance on radio in 1939.

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The Brox Sisters © 2016 James Abbe Archive via

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Darby and Brox sisters via

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The Brox Sisters, 1923  via

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The Brox Sisters and the Rhythm Boys in King of Jazz, 1930 via

 

 

Amazing Scenes From Silent Horror “The Phantom of the Opera” (1925)

The Phantom of the Opera is an American silent horror film adaptation of Gaston Leroux’s 1910 novel Le Fantôme de l’Opéra, directed by Rupert Julian and starring Lon Chaney, Sr. in the title role of the deformed Phantom who haunts the Paris Opera House, causing murder and mayhem in an attempt to make the woman he “loves” a star.

The film remains most famous for Chaney’s ghastly, self-devised make-up, which was kept a studio secret until the film’s premiere.

The film was released on November 25, 1925. The picture also features Mary Philbin, Norman Kerry, Arthur Edmund Carewe, Gibson Gowland, John St. Polis, and Snitz Edwards.

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The Phantom of the Opera directed by Rupert Julian, 1925 via

 

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The Phantom of the Opera directed by Rupert Julian, 1925 via

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 The Phantom of the Opera directed by Rupert Julian, 1925 via

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Mary Philbin and Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera directed by Rupert Julian, 1925 via

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Mary Philbin and Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera directed by Rupert Julian, 1925 via

 

Veronica Lake for Film Noir “This Gun for Hire” (1942)

This Gun for Hire is a 1942 film noir, directed by Frank Tuttle and based on the 1936 novel (published in America with the same title, and in Britain with the title A Gun for Sale) by Graham Greene. The

In the film Veronica Lake stars as nightclub singer Ellen Graham. The film also stars Robert Preston, Laird Cregar, and Alan Ladd, who the movie made a star of.

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Portrait of Veronica Lake in This Gun for Hire directed by Frank Tuttle, 1942  via

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Portrait of Veronica Lake in This Gun for Hire directed by Frank Tuttle, 1942  via

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Portrait of Veronica Lake in This Gun for Hire directed by Frank Tuttle, 1942  via

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Portrait of Veronica Lake in This Gun for Hire directed by Frank Tuttle, 1942  via

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Portrait of Veronica Lake in This Gun for Hire directed by Frank Tuttle, 1942  via

 

1942 Film Noir Veronica Lake Gun For Hire

Portrait of Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd in This Gun for Hire directed by Frank Tuttle, 1942 via

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Portrait of Alan Ladd, Robert Preston and Veronica Lake in This Gun for Hire directed by Frank Tuttle, 1942  via

Early Film Dancer Annabelle Moore (1878-1961)

Annabelle Moore (1878 – 1961) was an American dancer and actress who was quite popular in her youth. She appeared in at least nine films beween 1894 and 1897. The films were dance films and included “A Mermaid Dance”, “Butterfly Dance” and “Serpentine Dance”.

The sale of her films was further boosted in December 1896 when it was revealed that she had been approached to appear naked at a private dinner party at Sherry’s Restaurant – It is even said she introduced eroticism in film.

In 1907 Annabelle starred as the Gibson Bathing Girl in the first of  the Ziegfeld Follies.

In 1910 she married Edward James Buchan. He died in 1958 and Annabelle died penniless in Chicago in 1961. In her obituary in the New York Times it was said Annabelle:

“was the symbol of beauty in her day. She was billed as ‘the original Gibson Girl’ because of her striking resemblance to the Charles Dana Gibson portrait.”

Annabelle had a similar appearance to the Gibson Girl.  But as far as Gibson modeling his idealization of the perfect woman on Annabelle, there is little evidence that he did (source).

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Annabelle Moore, 1900s

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Annabelle Moore, 1908

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Annabelle Butterfly Dance (1894)

W.B. Yeats “Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen”

When Loie Fuller’s Chinese dancers enwound
A shining web, a floating ribbon of cloth,
It seemed that a dragon of air
Had fallen among dancers, had whirled them round
Or hurried them off on its own furious path;
So the Platonic Year
Whirls out new right and wrong,
Whirls in the old instead;
All men are dancers and their tread
Goes to the barbarous clangour of a gong.” – W.B. Yeats, ll.49-58 in the poem “Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen”.

Vintage Photos of Russian Prima Ballerina Alexandra Danilova

Aleksandra Dionisyevna Danilova (1903 – 1997) was a Russian-born prima ballerina, who became an American citizen. In 1989, she was recognized for lifetime achievements in ballet as a Kennedy Center Honoree.

Born in Peterhof, Russia on November 20, 1903, she trained at the Russian Imperial Ballet School in Leningrad (formerly and currently St. Petersburg). She was one of the few Russian-trained ballerinas to tour outside Russia. Her first professional post was as a member of St. Petersburg’s Imperial Ballet.

In 1924, she and George Balanchine left Russia. They were soon picked up by Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes; Danilova as a dancer, Balanchine as a choreographer. Danilova toured for years with the Ballets Russes under Sergei Diaghilev, then with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo after Diaghilev’s death.[1] With the latter company, Danilova andFrederic Franklin created one of the legendary ballet partnerships of the twentieth century. Danilova became known for her glamour and beautiful legs, as well as her work ethic and professionalism.

Danilova made her Broadway debut in 1944’s Song of Norway; her last ballet performance was in 1957.

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Alexandra Danilova photographed by George Platt Lynes, c. 1930s

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 Alexandra Danilova as a star of Colonel de Basil’s Ballet Russe  (1936)  by Maurice Seymour.

Courtesy of Ronald Seymour/Maurice Seymour Archive.

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Alexandra Danilova in Ballet Russe’s Nutcracker

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F. Franklin and Alexandra Danilova (1948) by Irving Penn.

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The Legs of Danilova, New York (1950) by Erwin Blumenfeld

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Alexandra Danilova dances in Gaite Parisienne