Vintage Photos of Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse (1958)

Bonjour Tristesse (“Hello, Sadness”) is a 1958 British-American Technicolor film in CinemaScope, directed and produced by Otto Preminger from a screenplay by Arthur Laurents based on the novel of the same title by Françoise Sagan.

A Guardian piece in 2012 described it as:

“an example of Hollywood’s golden age, and both its star and its famously tyrannical director are ripe for rediscovery.”

The film stars Jean Seberg as Cécile, a decadent young girl who lives with her rich playboy father, Raymond (David Niven). Anne (Deborah Kerr), a mature and cultured friend of Raymond’s late wife, arrives at Raymond’s villa for a visit.

Cécile is afraid that Anne will disrupt the undisciplined way of life that she has shared with her father, so she does her best to break up the relationship with Anne.

 

 

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Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse directed by Otto Preminger, 1958 via

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Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse directed by Otto Preminger, 1958 via

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Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse directed by Otto Preminger, 1958 via

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Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse directed by Otto Preminger, 1958 via

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Jean Seberg on the set of Bonjour Tristesse directed by Otto Preminger, 1958 via

 

Brigitte Bardot Dressed in Vintage Balmain for “The Bride Is Much Too Beautiful” (1956)

The Bride is Much Too Beautiful is a 1956 French comedy film directed by Pierre Gaspard-Huit.

It was also known as Her Bridal Night and La mariée est trop belle.

The wedding dress that Bardot wears in the film is by French designer Pierre Balmain.

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Brigitte Bardot in The Bride Is Much Too Beautiful directed by Pierre Gaspard-Huit, 1956. Dress by Pierre Balmain via

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Brigitte Bardot in The Bride Is Much Too Beautiful directed by Pierre Gaspard-Huit, 1956. Dress by Pierre Balmain via

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Brigitte Bardot in The Bride Is Much Too Beautiful directed by Pierre Gaspard-Huit, 1958. Dress by Pierre Balmain via

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Brigitte Bardot in The Bride Is Much Too Beautiful directed by Pierre Gaspard-Huit, 1956  via

 

Iconic 1960s Model Jean Shrimpton in New York by David Bailey (1962)

Jean Shrimpton’s (1942) was a fashion model and icon of Swinging London. Her  career rose to prominence through her work with photographer David Bailey.

Of Jean Shrimpton, Bailey said:

She was magic and the camera loved her too. In a way she was the cheapest model in the world – you only needed to shoot half a roll of film and then you had it. She had the knack of having her hand in the right place, she knew where the light was, she was just a natural.

Shrimpton’s first photo session with Bailey was in 1960 (either for Condé Nast’s Brides on 7 December 1960 or for British Vogue). She started to become known in the modelling world around the time she was working with Bailey.

Shrimpton has stated she owed Bailey her career, and he is often credited for discovering her and being influential in her career.

In turn, she was Bailey’s muse, and his photographs of her helped him rise to prominence in his early career.

 

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962  via

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962  via

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962  via

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David Bailey, Jean Shrimpton, New York, 1962  via

Horseplay with Yayoi Kusama in Woodstock (1967)

Yayoi Kusama (born 1929) is a Japanese artist and writer. Throughout her career she has worked in a wide variety of media, including painting, collage, soft sculpture, performance art, and environmental installations, most of which exhibit her thematic interest in psychedelic colors, repetition, and pattern. A precursor of the pop art, minimalist and feminist artmovements, Kusama influenced her contemporaries such as Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, and George Segal and exhibited works alongside the likes of them.

In 1957, she moved to the United States, settling down in New York City where she produced a series of paintings influenced by the abstract expressionist movement. Switching to sculpture and installation as her primary media, Kusama became a fixture of the New York avant-garde during the early 1960s where she became associated with the pop art movement. Embracing the rise of the hippiecounterculture of the late 1960s,

Kusama came to public attention when she organized a series of happenings in which naked participants were painted with brightly colored polka dots.

Although largely forgotten after departing the New York art scene in the early 1970s, Kusama is now acknowledged as one of the most important living artists to come out of Japan, and an important voice of the avant-garde.

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Yayoi Kusama, Horse Play in Woodstock, 1967 via

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Yayoi Kusama, Horse Play in Woodstock, 1967 via

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Yayoi Kusama, Horse Play in Woodstock, 1967 via

Hippie Chic Ossie Clark Dress by Norman Parkinson (1970)

Raymond “Ossie” Clark (1942 – 1996) was an English fashion designer who was a major figure in the Swinging Sixties scene in London and the fashion industry in that era.

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Ingrid Boulting in Ossie Clark Dress, photographed by Norman Parkinson, 1970 via

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Ingrid Boulting in Ossie Clark Dress, photographed by Norman Parkinson, 1970 via

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Ingrid Boulting in Ossie Clark Dress, photographed by Norman Parkinson, 1970 via