Portraits of Hollywood Actresses by Albert Witzel (1920s)

Witzel Studios was founded in Los Angeles by photographer Albert Walter Witzel (1879–1929) in 1909 and within a few years had become one of the city’s foremost portrait studios.

The rise of the business paralleled the emergence of the film industry following its relocation from the east coast, and Witzel was soon in demand from Hollywood studios seeking to create interest in movies by circulating promo shots of their stars. Distinguished by moody lighting and dramatic poses and settings, Witzel’s photos soon set the tone for Hollywood studio photography and from the mid-1910s they featured frequently in fan magazines like Photoplay, becoming an important promotional and publicity tool.

Witzel occasionally worked on assignment for the big picture studios, photographing many silent film luminaries including Theda Bara and Charlie Chaplin (source).

Clara_Bow_by_Albert_Witzel

Portrait of American actress Clara Bow by American photographer Albert Witzel (1879-1929) via

Blanche_Mehaffey_Witzel

Portrait of American actress & showgirl Blanche Mehaffey Witzel, 1920s by Albert Witzel (1879-1929) via

Bebe_Daniels_by_Witzel_1920

Portrait of Bebe Daniels by photographer Albert Witzel (1879-1929), 1920 via

Natalie_Kingston_by_Albert_Witzel

Portrait of American actress Natalie Kingston by Albert Witzel (1879-1929) via

Melva_Cornell_by_Albert_Witzel

Portrait of American actress Melva Cornell by Albert Witzel (1879-1929), 1920s via

Bessie_Love_Witzel.jpg

Portrait of American actress Bessie Love by Albert Witzel (1879-1929), 1920 via

Doris_May_by_Witzel

Portrait of American actress Doris May by Albert Witzel (1879-1929) , 1920 via

Clara Bow in “Call Her Savage” (1932)

096-clara-bow-theredlist

Hal Phyfe, Clara Bow in “Call Her Savage” directed by John Francis Dillon, 1932 via

062-hal-phyfe-theredlist

Hal Phyfe, Clara Bow in “Call Her Savage” directed by John Francis Dillon, 1932 via

011-hal-phyfe-theredlist

Hal Phyfe, Clara Bow in “Call Her Savage” directed by John Francis Dillon, 1932 via

Famous Flappers of the Roaring Twenties

Flappers were a “new breed” of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.

Flappers had their origins in the liberal period of the Roaring Twenties, the social, political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of World War I, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe.

zelda

Zelda Fitzgerald was an American socialite and novelist, and the wife of American author F. Scott Fitzgerald, who dubbed her “the first American Flapper”. She and Scott became the emblem of the Jazz Age, for which they are still celebrated via

1926: Hollywood film star, Clara Bow (1905 - 1965) in a shiny strapless dress. (Photo by Eugene Robert Richee)

Clara Bow epitomized the Roaring Twenties’ flapper. At only 25, she retired exhausted by repeated scandals about her presumed sexual life. Photo: Bow in a shiny strapless dress by Eugene Robert Richee, 1926 via

moore

 Coleen Moore was Bow´s “chief rival”. After Bow took the stage Moore gradually lost her momentum. In spring 1924 she made a good, but unsuccessful effort to top Bow in The Perfect Flapper, and soon after she dismissed the whole flapper vogue. Photo: Coleen Moore in “Why Be Good?”, 1929 via

louise-brooks-theredlist

Louise Brooks 1920. She was an American dancer and actress noted as an iconic symbol of the flapper, and for popularizing the bobbed haircut via

gray-gilda

Gilda Gray, 1924. She was an American actress and dancer who popularized a dance called the “shimmy” which became fashionable in 1920s films and theater productions via

bankhead

Tallulah Brockman, 1922. Bankhead was an American actress of the stage and screen, and a reputed libertine britannica.com

Anita_Loos_-_Apr_1922_Photoplay

Anita Loos was an American screenwriter, playwright and author, best known for her blockbuster comic novel, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes first published in 1925. It was one of several famous novels published that year that chronicled the so-called Jazz Age – including Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Photo: Loos, on page 12 of the April 1922 Photoplay via

Glamorous Clara Bow by Eugene Robert Richee (1920s)

clara-bow6

Clara Bow by Eugene Robert Richee, 1920s via

eugene-robert-richee8

Clara Bow by Eugene Robert Richee, 1920s via

clara-bow5

Clara Bow by Eugene Robert Richee, 1920s via

clara-bow

Clara Bow by Eugene Robert Richee, 1920s via

clara-bow4

Clara Bow by Eugene Robert Richee, 1920s via

eugene-robert-richee

Clara Bow by Eugene Robert Richee, 1920s via

clara-bow1

Clara Bow by Eugene Robert Richee, 1920s via