Amazing Vintage Photos of Actresses attending the Film Festival in Cannes during the Sixties

The Cannes Film Festival was founded in 1946. The invitation-only festival is held annually (usually in May) at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès.

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Marie Laforêt, Cannes, 1961 via

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Sophia Loren at the Cannes Film Festival, 1966 via

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Cannes, 1967 via

Jeanne Moreau in Cannes, 1966

Jeanne Moreau in Cannes, 1966 via

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Natalie Wood, 1962 via

Romy Schneider at Cannes, 1961

Romy Schneider at Cannes, 1961 via

Princess Grace

Princess Grace of Manaco, Cannes 1960 via

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Claudia Cardinale, 1963 via

Geraldine Chaplin, 1967

Geraldine Chaplin, 1967 via

Vintage Glamour Photos of Old Hollywood Actresses Wearing Gloves

Ava Gardner

Ava Gardner via bellazon.com

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Hedy Lamarr via rarephotos.info

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Jane Russell via hippowallpapers.com

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Audrey Hepburn via reddit.com

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Anita Ekberg via tumblr.com

Old Hollywood Photos by Irving “Lippy” Lippman

Irving Isadore Lippman (1906 – 2006) was born in Edendale, California to Samuel and Celia Lippman, who emigrated from Russia in the late 1800’s. “Lippy,” as he was affectionately called spent 60 years in the film industry beginning as a sixteen-year old assistant camerman on a silent era comedy directed by Fatty Arbuckle in 1922 for $25 per week.

Lippman held various jobs and titles during his tenure in the business from still photographer and film director to cinematographer. He photographed and caught on film such beauties as Mae West, Rita Hayworth, Marilyn Monroe, Joan Crawford, Ginger Rogers, Jean Arthur, Claudette Colbert and Barbara Stanwyck

His last service to the industry was as cinematographer on Love Boat in 1982. He died on November 15, 2006 in Woodland Hills, California.

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Rita Hayworth (Photo by Irving Lippman, 1938) via

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Bette Davis  (Photo by Irving Lippman) via

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Miriam Hopkins (Photo by Irving Lippman, 1933) via

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Tallulah Bankhead (Photo by irving lippman) via

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Fay Wray (Photo by Irving Lippman, 1936) via

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 Claudette Colbert (Photo By Irving Lippman, 1933) via

Stunning Female Portraits by Pioneering Photographer Félix Nadar

Nadar was the pseudonym of Gaspard-Félix Tournachon (1820 – 1910), a French photographer, caricaturist, journalist, novelist, and balloonist.

Nadar was born in April 1820 in Paris (though some sources state Lyon). He took his first photographs in 1853 and in 1858 became the first person to take aerial photographs. He also pioneered the use of artificial lighting in photography, working in the catacombs of Paris and later became the number one portrait photographer for the French elite.  In April 1874, he lent his photo studio to a group of painters, thus making the first exhibition of the Impressionists possible. Nadar died in 1910, aged 89. He was buried in Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Today, examples of Nadar’s photographic portraits are held by many of the great national collections of photographs.

Petite fille, ca 1887 Felix Nadar

Selika Lazevski was an écuyère who performed haute école – which means she was an equestrian who rode high school dressage in French circuses in the 19th century, by Félix Nadar 1891 via pinterest

Polaire (1874-1939) by Félix Nadar via blogspot

French photographer Felix Nadar was the first to take aerial photographs and later became the number one portrait photographer for the French elite. [Sarah Bernard]

Sarah Bernardt  by Félix Nadar via wiki

Cléo de Merode by Felix Nadar, c.1900

Cléo de Mérode by Félix Nadar, c.1900 via pinterest

George Sand by Félix Nadar 1864 via wiki

Berthe Morisot, 1875,  by Felix Nadar via blogspot

Edward Steichen – Hollywood Portraits

Edward Jean Steichen (1879 – 1973) was an American photographer, painter, and art gallery and museum curator.

Steichen was the most frequently featured photographer in Alfred Stieglitz’ groundbreaking magazine Camera Work during its run from 1903 to 1917. Together Stieglitz and Steichen opened the Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession, which eventually became known as 291 after its address.

His photos of gowns for the magazine Art et Décoration in 1911 are regarded as the first modern fashion photographs ever published. From 1923 to 1938, Steichen was a photographer for the Condé Nast magazines Vogue and Vanity Fair while also working for many advertising agencies includingJ. Walter Thompson. During these years, Steichen was regarded as the best known and highest paid photographer in the world. In 1944, he directed the war documentary The Fighting Lady, which won the 1945 Academy Award for Best Documentary.

After World War II, Steichen was Director of the Department of Photography at New York’s Museum of Modern Art until 1962. While at MoMA, he curated and assembled the exhibit The Family of Man, which was seen by nine million people

Gloria Swanson 1924 by Edward Steichen

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Edward Steichen

Anna Mae Wong by Edward Steichen 1931

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Marlene Dietrich by Edward Steichen 1932

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Joan Crawford in a dress by Schiaparelli, 1932; photo by Edward Steichen

Joan Crawford by Edward Steichen

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Lillian Gish by Edward Steichen 1934

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Greta Garbo 1928 by Edward Steichen

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Superb Vintage Photos of Beautiful Edwardian Era Hairstyles

Edwardian hairstyles were largely dictated by the millinery trade. The hairstyles had a soft, fluffy and loose fluidity about them. Hair was dressed off the face, with the exception of a fringe, and hairstyles rarely had a parting.

The defining Edwardian hairstyle for women was the pompadour. After the Pompadour´s initial popularity among fashionable women in the 18th century, it was revived as part of the Gibson Girl look in the 1890s and continued to be in vogue until World War I.

Other hairstyles were fx. the Low Pompadour (for everyday), Hat Pin Hairstyles (for the late Edwardian Cartwheel hat), the Gibson Tuck, the Side-Swirl (the style allowed women to easier wear the picture hats), the bouffant and the chignon. Usually the full Pompadour hairstyle was kept for special occasions. In the early part of the Edwardian era it was accompanied by the “picture” hat; hats that were worn high on the head and heavily decorated with fabric, feathers or imitation flowers or fruit.

The  Pompadour hairstyle could be dressed in all manner of styles, but the basic concept is hair swept upwards from the face and worn high over the forehead, and sometimes upswept around the sides and back as well. The style could feature soft coils and fuzzy curled fringes. It could be decorated with a bun, chignon or knot, depending on what was in vogue at the time and the occasion. Chignons tended to sit low on the nape, or at the back of the head. A bun could also be situated on the crown. A knot is hair that is twisted to form a rope, and then coiled to form a shape. The different shapes had names, for example the Apollo Kno, the Psyche Knot and the Grecian Knot. A topknot sits high on the head.

Evelyn Nesbit, who posed for illustrator Charles Dana Gibson, and became known as the first “Gibson Girl.”

Gibson’s drawings of women represented the feminin ideal of the time.

via Flickr.

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The Soft Pompadour and Psyche Knot.
From Girls Own Paper and Woman’s magazine, 1911 via tumblr

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Gibson Girls with Pompadour hair via Tumblr

After the Victorian era hair got bigger and bigger via DeviantArt

Actress Gabrielle Ray´s hairstyle fits her large decorated hat 1906 via Flickr

Edwardian lady with big frizzy hair via Deviantart

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Miss Ethel Oliver with big Edwardian hair via Flickr

Lily Elsie (Mrs Bullough), by Bassano Ltd, circa 1905 - NPG x15360 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

Miss Lily Elsie by Bassano via Npg.

Nancy Astor, 1908. beautiful portrait.

Nancy Astor with a knot, 1908 via Blogspot

Victorian/Edwardian model with a bun via Shorpy

Postcards of the Lovely Maude Fealy

Actress Maude Fealy (born Maude Hawk) appeared in many silent and talking pictures. During the early twentieth century she was one of the leading ladies of the American stage. Throughout her career, Fealy taught acting in many cities where she lived and over the years she was drama coach to many noted personalities including Douglas Fairbanks Sr.

Her youthful beauty made Fealy a popular subject for postcards – in 1916, a Los Angeles Times reporter covering a party hosted by Maude noted that the actress, then in her mid-thirties, looked closer to 18, rather than her current age.

 

Maud Fealy wearing a hat

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Maud in costume

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Maud Fealy

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Maud Fealy

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Maude Fealy on Screen

 In 1913 she signed a three-year contract with the Thanhouser film studio, appearing in such films as Moths and The Legend of Provence.  In 1916 she signed with Jesse Lasky Picture Co., and stayed with them for a year. In the post-silent era, she would appear in nearly every Cecil B. DeMille movie.